Solved: Where in turbotax do i enter gift received of 10k from parent? Father-in-Law says I have to disclose it on my Tax Return.
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New Member

Where in turbotax do i enter gift received of 10k from parent? Father-in-Law says I have to disclose it on my Tax Return.

I saw a reference to form 8103, but that doesn't tell me where to enter the information in Turbo Tax!


I saw something about a Generation Skipping Credit, but that is only if I paid taxes on the gift, which I did not.

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Level 9

Where in turbotax do i enter gift received of 10k from parent? Father-in-Law says I have to disclose it on my Tax Return.

Is your father in law treating it as a gift or is he claiming it as a deduction on a 1099 for services?

The donor is generally responsible for paying the gift tax. Under special arrangements the donee may agree to pay the tax instead. Most likely won't apply for just $10k.

The annual exclusion applies to gifts to each donee. In other words, if you give each of your children $11,000 in 2002-2005, $12,000 in 2006-2008, $13,000 in 2009-2012 and $14,000 on or after January 1, 2013, the annual exclusion applies to each gift. The annual exclusion for 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017 is $14,000. For 2018, the annual exclusion is $15,000.

There is a lifetime amount of $5.49mm.

You can read more here:

https://turbotax.intuit.com/tax-tips/estates/the-gift-tax-made-simple/L5tGWVC8N

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Level 15

Where in turbotax do i enter gift received of 10k from parent? Father-in-Law says I have to disclose it on my Tax Return.

There is no IRS Form 8103.
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New Member

Where in turbotax do i enter gift received of 10k from parent? Father-in-Law says I have to disclose it on my Tax Return.

You don’t need to report anything unless it is over the limit.
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Level 9

Where in turbotax do i enter gift received of 10k from parent? Father-in-Law says I have to disclose it on my Tax Return.

Is your father in law treating it as a gift or is he claiming it as a deduction on a 1099 for services?

The donor is generally responsible for paying the gift tax. Under special arrangements the donee may agree to pay the tax instead. Most likely won't apply for just $10k.

The annual exclusion applies to gifts to each donee. In other words, if you give each of your children $11,000 in 2002-2005, $12,000 in 2006-2008, $13,000 in 2009-2012 and $14,000 on or after January 1, 2013, the annual exclusion applies to each gift. The annual exclusion for 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017 is $14,000. For 2018, the annual exclusion is $15,000.

There is a lifetime amount of $5.49mm.

You can read more here:

https://turbotax.intuit.com/tax-tips/estates/the-gift-tax-made-simple/L5tGWVC8N

View solution in original post

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New Member

Where in turbotax do i enter gift received of 10k from parent? Father-in-Law says I have to disclose it on my Tax Return.

That is not correct. Gifts are never taxable to the recipient.

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Level 15

Where in turbotax do i enter gift received of 10k from parent? Father-in-Law says I have to disclose it on my Tax Return.

It is not taxable, but can be recorded as nontaxable income in the Sales Tax deduction section if you itemize.
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Level 9

Where in turbotax do i enter gift received of 10k from parent? Father-in-Law says I have to disclose it on my Tax Return.

@SweetieJean  There are arrangements allowed by the IRS that the recipient pays the tax....  See IRS who pays the tax section:  <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/frequently-asked-questions-on-gift-tax...>
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Level 15

Where in turbotax do i enter gift received of 10k from parent? Father-in-Law says I have to disclose it on my Tax Return.

Father- in - law is mistaken.  Gifts that you receive are not taxable and do not get entered on your tax return.  Nor are gifts given to individuals deductible for the person who gave the gift.

**Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to offer the most correct information possible. The poster disclaims any legal responsibility for the accuracy of the information that is contained in this post.**
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