Sign Up

Why sign in to the Community?

  • Submit a question
  • Check your notifications
or and start working on your taxes
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
rrch123
New Member

Joint Account with Parents-My Tax Burden, and Locking Away Funds for The Next Year

My parents, (who are divorced) received insurance disbursement payments, one of equal amount to each of them.   I was told by the bank as long as I was secondary on the account that I would not be taxed, so opened up two bank accounts with them as the primary and me as the secondary account holder.   At this point, we want to lock away the money for the next year, we were thinking CDs would be a good option.   Are the any other good methods?   Main thing would be to keep my name on both of their accounts, while at the same time not taking on any tax burden.


1 Best answer

Accepted Solutions
Opus 17
Level 15

Joint Account with Parents-My Tax Burden, and Locking Away Funds for The Next Year

A recipient of insurance payments generally doesn't pay income tax on the payment.  If the payment is invested and earns income or otherwise gains value, someone has to pay tax on that income.

CDs are certainly safe but very low yield.  Whether that is the best investment choice is a question for an investment advisor considering your risk tolerance and investment goals.

I don't think the IRS cares who pays tax on the interest as long as someone does.  If you are a joint legal owner of the money, then you are jointly liable for the income tax on the interest earned, even if your SSN is not on the account.  The fact that your parent's SSNs would be on the accounts means that the 1099-INT forms will be issued in their names and they will probably pay the tax on those interest earnings.  But leaving your SSN off the account does not absolve you of the responsibility of paying the tax if for some reason your parents' don't.  The IRS could come after both owners.  (But the IRS won't have any reason to look at you as long as your parents do report the income and pay the tax.)

Whether to open 1 CD or 2 is also a matter for an investment advisor or legal advisor.  If it was me, I would not want to make my ex-spouse a co-owner of my money -- too many possible complications down the road.  I would suggest two separate accounts for the two parents.
*Answers are correct to the best of my ability at the time of posting but do not constitute legal or tax advice.*

View solution in original post

5 Replies
SweetieJean
Level 15

Joint Account with Parents-My Tax Burden, and Locking Away Funds for The Next Year

The tax forms are usually issued in the SSN of the primary account holder.
rrch123
New Member

Joint Account with Parents-My Tax Burden, and Locking Away Funds for The Next Year

So if we open a CD in one of the parent's primary name?   I would think that if both parent's consolidated the funds into in CD, then one would assume the tax burden for the other then, right?   So in this case, I would want to help them open a CD independently?
Opus 17
Level 15

Joint Account with Parents-My Tax Burden, and Locking Away Funds for The Next Year

A recipient of insurance payments generally doesn't pay income tax on the payment.  If the payment is invested and earns income or otherwise gains value, someone has to pay tax on that income.

CDs are certainly safe but very low yield.  Whether that is the best investment choice is a question for an investment advisor considering your risk tolerance and investment goals.

I don't think the IRS cares who pays tax on the interest as long as someone does.  If you are a joint legal owner of the money, then you are jointly liable for the income tax on the interest earned, even if your SSN is not on the account.  The fact that your parent's SSNs would be on the accounts means that the 1099-INT forms will be issued in their names and they will probably pay the tax on those interest earnings.  But leaving your SSN off the account does not absolve you of the responsibility of paying the tax if for some reason your parents' don't.  The IRS could come after both owners.  (But the IRS won't have any reason to look at you as long as your parents do report the income and pay the tax.)

Whether to open 1 CD or 2 is also a matter for an investment advisor or legal advisor.  If it was me, I would not want to make my ex-spouse a co-owner of my money -- too many possible complications down the road.  I would suggest two separate accounts for the two parents.
*Answers are correct to the best of my ability at the time of posting but do not constitute legal or tax advice.*
SweetieJean
Level 15

Joint Account with Parents-My Tax Burden, and Locking Away Funds for The Next Year

This is an income tax forum, not one that gives financial or estate planning advice. Depending upon your reasons for  Joint accounts and the dollar amounts in question, you may wish to see a local professional.

VolvoGirl
Level 15

Joint Account with Parents-My Tax Burden, and Locking Away Funds for The Next Year

And don't take tax advice from the bank.  Ask a real accountant or tax accountant.
Dynamic AdsDynamic Ads
Privacy Settings
v