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pacer1309
New Member

I am a minister who moved for a nonpaid ministerial position. Can I still claim moving expenses?

 
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JulieH1
New Member

I am a minister who moved for a nonpaid ministerial position. Can I still claim moving expenses?

If the church ended up hiring you to work in the church in a paid position within a year and you meet the other guidelines to deduct, then you can deduct the moving expenses.  If they did not hire you within the year, you are a volunteer.  See information at the end of the post for deductible charitable expsenses.

You can deduct your moving expenses if you meet all three of the following requirements:

  • Your move closely relates to the start of work

  • You meet the distance test

  • You meet the time test

Move Related to Start of Work - Your move must closely relate both in time and in place to the start of work at your new location. You can consider moving expenses incurred within one year from the date you first reported to work at the new location as closely related in time to the start of work. A move generally relates closely in place if the distance from your new home to the new job location isn't more than the distance from your former home to the new job location. For exceptions to these requirements, see Publication 521, Moving Expenses.

The distance test - Your new workplace must be at least 50 miles farther from your old home than your old job location was from your old home. If you had no previous workplace, your new job location must be at least 50 miles from your old home.

The time test - If you're an employee, you must work full-time for at least 39 weeks during the first 12 months immediately following your arrival in the general area of your new job location. If you're self-employed, you must work full time for at least 39 weeks during the first 12 months and for a total of at least 78 weeks during the first 24 months immediately following your arrival in the general area of your new work location. There are exceptions to the time test in case of death, disability, and involuntary separation, among other things. See Publication 521 for these exceptions.”

If you meet the requirements discussed above, you can deduct the following expenses associated with your move:

  1. The cost of moving your household goods and personal effects

  2. Storage Expenses - This is allowed for a period of one month after the move from your former home.

  3. The Costs of Travel and Lodging”

If you are actually a volunteer.  As such you could deduct the expenses under a charitable donation on Schedule A if you itemize.  

Per IRS, you can deduct volunteer expenses, if you meet the following qualifications:

  1. You must volunteer to work for a qualified organization. Ask the charity about its tax-exempt status. You can also visit IRS.gov and use the Select Check tool to see if the group is qualified.

  2. You may be able to deduct unreimbursed travel expenses you pay while serving as a volunteer. You can’t deduct the value of your time or services.

  3. The deduction qualifies only if there is no significant element of personal pleasure, recreation or vacation in the travel. However, the deduction will qualify even if you enjoy the trip.

  4. You can deduct your travel expenses if your work is real and substantial throughout the trip. You can’t deduct expenses if you only have nominal duties or do not have any duties for significant parts of the trip.

  5. Deductible travel expenses may include:
    • Air, rail and bus transportation
    • Car expenses
    • Lodging costs
    • The cost of meals
    • Taxi fares or other transportation costs between the airport or station and your hotel

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1 Reply
JulieH1
New Member

I am a minister who moved for a nonpaid ministerial position. Can I still claim moving expenses?

If the church ended up hiring you to work in the church in a paid position within a year and you meet the other guidelines to deduct, then you can deduct the moving expenses.  If they did not hire you within the year, you are a volunteer.  See information at the end of the post for deductible charitable expsenses.

You can deduct your moving expenses if you meet all three of the following requirements:

  • Your move closely relates to the start of work

  • You meet the distance test

  • You meet the time test

Move Related to Start of Work - Your move must closely relate both in time and in place to the start of work at your new location. You can consider moving expenses incurred within one year from the date you first reported to work at the new location as closely related in time to the start of work. A move generally relates closely in place if the distance from your new home to the new job location isn't more than the distance from your former home to the new job location. For exceptions to these requirements, see Publication 521, Moving Expenses.

The distance test - Your new workplace must be at least 50 miles farther from your old home than your old job location was from your old home. If you had no previous workplace, your new job location must be at least 50 miles from your old home.

The time test - If you're an employee, you must work full-time for at least 39 weeks during the first 12 months immediately following your arrival in the general area of your new job location. If you're self-employed, you must work full time for at least 39 weeks during the first 12 months and for a total of at least 78 weeks during the first 24 months immediately following your arrival in the general area of your new work location. There are exceptions to the time test in case of death, disability, and involuntary separation, among other things. See Publication 521 for these exceptions.”

If you meet the requirements discussed above, you can deduct the following expenses associated with your move:

  1. The cost of moving your household goods and personal effects

  2. Storage Expenses - This is allowed for a period of one month after the move from your former home.

  3. The Costs of Travel and Lodging”

If you are actually a volunteer.  As such you could deduct the expenses under a charitable donation on Schedule A if you itemize.  

Per IRS, you can deduct volunteer expenses, if you meet the following qualifications:

  1. You must volunteer to work for a qualified organization. Ask the charity about its tax-exempt status. You can also visit IRS.gov and use the Select Check tool to see if the group is qualified.

  2. You may be able to deduct unreimbursed travel expenses you pay while serving as a volunteer. You can’t deduct the value of your time or services.

  3. The deduction qualifies only if there is no significant element of personal pleasure, recreation or vacation in the travel. However, the deduction will qualify even if you enjoy the trip.

  4. You can deduct your travel expenses if your work is real and substantial throughout the trip. You can’t deduct expenses if you only have nominal duties or do not have any duties for significant parts of the trip.

  5. Deductible travel expenses may include:
    • Air, rail and bus transportation
    • Car expenses
    • Lodging costs
    • The cost of meals
    • Taxi fares or other transportation costs between the airport or station and your hotel

View solution in original post

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