Sign Up

Why sign in to the Community?

  • Submit a question
  • Check your notifications
or and start working on your taxes
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
bmnsmn0907
New Member

How do I enter the dates for part year residency if I began the year in GA, then moved to NC and was then relocated back to GA before the end of the year?

 
5 Replies
rjs
Level 15
Level 15

How do I enter the dates for part year residency if I began the year in GA, then moved to NC and was then relocated back to GA before the end of the year?

There's no way to enter two separate periods of part-year residency in TurboTax because there's no way to show it on the Georgia tax return form. TurboTax can't provide a way to handle a situation that the state forms don't provide for.


I suggest that you call the Georgia Department of Revenue (877-423-6711) and ask them what you should do. Post a reply in this thread to let us know what they say.

 

bmnsmn0907
New Member

How do I enter the dates for part year residency if I began the year in GA, then moved to NC and was then relocated back to GA before the end of the year?

Thanks!  I called Georgia and told me that their form doesn’t require dates for part year residents and they were not sure why TurboTax was asking for it.  I printed the Schedule 3 form for part year and it does not ask for dates.  They told me to call TurboTax to ask why the dates are requested.

rjs
Level 15
Level 15

How do I enter the dates for part year residency if I began the year in GA, then moved to NC and was then relocated back to GA before the end of the year?

@bmnsmn0907 

Schedule 3 does not require the dates, but the main tax form, Form 500, does require the dates. The dates are on line 4 of Form 500, just below your name and address. For a part-year resident the instructions for Form 500 line 4 say "Note: List the dates you lived in Georgia." TurboTax asks for the dates because Form 500 requires the dates. But there is only room for one pair of beginning and ending dates.


I suggest that you call again, and if you get someone equally ignorant, tell them to look at Form 500 line 4.

 

SteamTrain
Level 15

How do I enter the dates for part year residency if I began the year in GA, then moved to NC and was then relocated back to GA before the end of the year?

Heck, in other years in this situation,  you'd indicate you were a full yr resident of GA the whole year, and then treat NC as a a temporary residence that  you didn't really "move" to. ...since you were there  only temporarily. 

 

The you'd prepare and file the NC nonresident tax return reporting just the portion of your W-2 wage income that you received while physically working there....and if any ends up getting taxed by NC, you'll get a credit on the GA tax return for any taxes NC kept.  But you do have to prepare the NC non-resident tax return first.

 

That's the only way I can see to handle it......but that's just my opinion. I don't think any State's tax returns allow for two moves during the year claiming you were a resident of one...then the other...then to a 3rd state (or back to the original in your case).  Just treat the middle state as income as a non-resident

*Answers are correct to the best of my knowledge when posted, but should not be considered to be legal or official tax advice.*
TomD8
Level 15

How do I enter the dates for part year residency if I began the year in GA, then moved to NC and was then relocated back to GA before the end of the year?

One good thing about @SteamTrain 's suggestion is that neither state really gets cheated if you follow his procedure.

That's because - due to the out-of-state credit you can take and the fact that the two states have almost identical tax rates - the bottom line taxes you would pay to each state using his method are virtually the same as you'd pay if you could do a "back and forth" residency in TurboTax.

Your NC income is taxed the same by NC whether you file as a part-year resident or as a non-resident.

If you file in both states as a part-year resident, GA taxes the GA portion and NC taxes the NC portion.

If you file in GA as full-year resident and in NC as a non-resident, GA taxes both portions, but gives you a credit for the taxes paid to NC on the NC portion.

Without doing the math, I think it's pretty close to a wash either way.  

 

 

**Answers are correct to the best of my ability but do not constitute tax or legal advice.
Dynamic AdsDynamic Ads
Privacy Settings
v