Solved: What exactly does did you support yourself mean
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What exactly does did you support yourself mean

I live at home with my parents but pay all my own bills
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Level 15

What exactly does did you support yourself mean

I seriously doubt you support yourself. Just the fact you live under your parents roof without paying rent is enough in itself to say that there is no way you provide more then 50% of your own support. "Pay my own bills" is not supporting oneself. It depends on what those bills are. Cable, telephone bills aren't support. (you can live without them just fine). Electric and water bill is support (you need those). Living in your parents house, you pay neither. Those are just two examples.

If you're a college student, most likely you do not provide more than have of your own support if an undergrad under the age of 24 on Dec 31 of the tax year. Additionally, scholarships/grants/529 funds just flat out do not count for you providing your own support.

For a college student, it is perfectly possible for that student to earn a million dollars in the tax year, and for the parents to still qualify to claim that student.

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1 Reply
Level 15

What exactly does did you support yourself mean

I seriously doubt you support yourself. Just the fact you live under your parents roof without paying rent is enough in itself to say that there is no way you provide more then 50% of your own support. "Pay my own bills" is not supporting oneself. It depends on what those bills are. Cable, telephone bills aren't support. (you can live without them just fine). Electric and water bill is support (you need those). Living in your parents house, you pay neither. Those are just two examples.

If you're a college student, most likely you do not provide more than have of your own support if an undergrad under the age of 24 on Dec 31 of the tax year. Additionally, scholarships/grants/529 funds just flat out do not count for you providing your own support.

For a college student, it is perfectly possible for that student to earn a million dollars in the tax year, and for the parents to still qualify to claim that student.

View solution in original post

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