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kdalida
New Member

Was only insured for part of 2016 because I was a student/unemployed and had no income. I started having income after graduation and was insured through my employer.

Insurance was unaffordable until I got a job in June. Do I need to pay the fee for the first 6 months?
1 Reply
NicoleU
New Member

Was only insured for part of 2016 because I was a student/unemployed and had no income. I started having income after graduation and was insured through my employer.

That will depend on your overall situation, there are a couple of exemptions that you may qualify:

  • Hardship: If one of the following hardships or situations kept you from getting health insurance in 2016, you can apply for a penalty exemption after you file your taxes. If approved, you'll qualify to get back all or some of your penalty. It works like a rebate. We'll help you complete the application and submit it to the Marketplace after your taxes are filed.

    Had health insurance plan issues
    - Health insurance company canceled plan.
    - Appealed Marketplace denial and won.

    Faced financial hardship
    - Couldn't pay medical bills.
    - Got a utility shut-off notice.
    - Filed for bankruptcy.
    - Home damaged in fire, flood or other disaster.
    - Was evicted or foreclosed on.
    - Homeless now or last year.

    Had another situation
    - Family member passed away.
    - Was caring for an ill, disabled or aging family member.
    - Suffered domestic violence.
    - Someone else was required to insure my dependent.
    - Served in AmeriCorps (State, National, VISTA or NCCC).
    - Member of a religious sect opposed to insurance.
  • Affordability: if you were offered health insurance through a job, and the minimum amount you would've paid toward the premiums on the lowest-cost coverage available through the Health Insurance Marketplace would have cost you more than 8.13% of your household income, then the coverage is not affordable to you.

    In addition, if you lived in a state in 2016 that chose not to expand Medicaid and your income is below 138% of the 2015 federal poverty level for your household size, then no affordable options were available to you. (The federal poverty levels for 2015 were: $11,770 for an individual, $15,930 for a household of two, $20,090 for a household of three and $24,250 for a household of four.) This includes Alabama, Alaska, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

As you go through the Health Insurance, you will see a list of exemptions. Please see the screenshot
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