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nixythepixie
New Member

So Im a 19 year old student and I did a lot of reading about family members claiming you on their taxes and what counts and what doesn’t. In my specific situation, my mother lives in vegas, my fa

 
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Accepted Solutions
DianeW
Expert Alumni

So Im a 19 year old student and I did a lot of reading about family members claiming you on their taxes and what counts and what doesn’t. In my specific situation, my mother lives in vegas, my fa

If you do not provide more than half of your own support and you live with one of your parents, then only that parent has the right to claim you.  The custodial parent has the option of waiving that exemption to the other noncustodial parent.  The rules for claiming your own exemption is shown below.

Your Own Exemption

You can take one exemption for yourself unless you can be claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer. If another taxpayer is entitled to claim you as a dependent, you cannot take an exemption for yourself even if the other taxpayer doesn't actually claim you as a dependent.

Attached are the Qualifying Child Rules so you are able to review them.  If you are entitled to claim your daughter as a dependent she is not eligible to claim her own exemption.

Qualifying Child:

  • The child must be related to you. The child can be your son, daughter, stepchild, eligible foster child, brother, sister, half-brother, half-sister, stepbrother, stepsister, adopted child or an offspring of any of them.
  • Your child must be under age 19 or, if a full-time student, under age 24. There is no age limit if your child is permanently and totally disabled.
  • Your child must live with you for more than half the year, but several exceptions apply (ie. away at school).
  • The child cannot provide more than half of his/her support.
  • You must be the only person claiming the child
  • The child must be a US citizen, resident alien, national, or resident of Mexico or Canada.
  • The child cannot file a joint return with his or her spouse. 
  • Click the image to enlarge and view.

This link will provide a Dependency Worksheet to help you decide if you provide more than half of your own support.  If so you will be the only one entitled to take your exemption.

[Edited:  01.23.2018 | 5:33 AM)

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6 Replies
xmasbaby0
Level 15

So Im a 19 year old student and I did a lot of reading about family members claiming you on their taxes and what counts and what doesn’t. In my specific situation, my mother lives in vegas, my fa

Your question cut off.  What is the rest of your question?
**Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to offer the most correct information possible. The poster disclaims any legal responsibility for the accuracy of the information that is contained in this post.**
nixythepixie
New Member

So Im a 19 year old student and I did a lot of reading about family members claiming you on their taxes and what counts and what doesn’t. In my specific situation, my mother lives in vegas, my fa

My apologies, not sure why it cut off, as this is a complicated situation to explain I think. So Im a 19 year old student and I did a lot of reading about family members claiming you on their taxes and what counts and what doesn't. In my specific situation, my mother lives in vegas, my father lives in washington state, and i live in kentucky with a friend. They do not provide for 50% of my living expenses, and if anything was provided its less than $100 usually on rare occasion. I live with my partner and her parents while we go to college together. They are the ones who help provide food for us but we both make our own money with weekend jobs and work study. I pay for 95% of all the things I need for college and more. Is it safe to say "No" when it asks if I can be claimed under a family members taxes? I don't want to list anything incorrectly , they just don't pay for any of my expenses so Im confused.
DianeW
Expert Alumni

So Im a 19 year old student and I did a lot of reading about family members claiming you on their taxes and what counts and what doesn’t. In my specific situation, my mother lives in vegas, my fa

If you do not provide more than half of your own support and you live with one of your parents, then only that parent has the right to claim you.  The custodial parent has the option of waiving that exemption to the other noncustodial parent.  The rules for claiming your own exemption is shown below.

Your Own Exemption

You can take one exemption for yourself unless you can be claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer. If another taxpayer is entitled to claim you as a dependent, you cannot take an exemption for yourself even if the other taxpayer doesn't actually claim you as a dependent.

Attached are the Qualifying Child Rules so you are able to review them.  If you are entitled to claim your daughter as a dependent she is not eligible to claim her own exemption.

Qualifying Child:

  • The child must be related to you. The child can be your son, daughter, stepchild, eligible foster child, brother, sister, half-brother, half-sister, stepbrother, stepsister, adopted child or an offspring of any of them.
  • Your child must be under age 19 or, if a full-time student, under age 24. There is no age limit if your child is permanently and totally disabled.
  • Your child must live with you for more than half the year, but several exceptions apply (ie. away at school).
  • The child cannot provide more than half of his/her support.
  • You must be the only person claiming the child
  • The child must be a US citizen, resident alien, national, or resident of Mexico or Canada.
  • The child cannot file a joint return with his or her spouse. 
  • Click the image to enlarge and view.

This link will provide a Dependency Worksheet to help you decide if you provide more than half of your own support.  If so you will be the only one entitled to take your exemption.

[Edited:  01.23.2018 | 5:33 AM)

DianeW
Expert Alumni

So Im a 19 year old student and I did a lot of reading about family members claiming you on their taxes and what counts and what doesn’t. In my specific situation, my mother lives in vegas, my fa

@nixythepixie  Student loan funds would be considered provided by you if you are liable for the loan and of course your job proceeds are provided by you.  There is also a question of intent and your permanent mailing address on school records, etc.
nixythepixie
New Member

So Im a 19 year old student and I did a lot of reading about family members claiming you on their taxes and what counts and what doesn’t. In my specific situation, my mother lives in vegas, my fa

Yes the student loans are under my name as well and everything. So would all that mean that Id be able to say that my parents or relatives cant claim me?
DianeW
Expert Alumni

So Im a 19 year old student and I did a lot of reading about family members claiming you on their taxes and what counts and what doesn’t. In my specific situation, my mother lives in vegas, my fa

@nixythepixie Use the worksheet as your backup for your records.  And keep in mind that the other family, where you are living, may be contributing with food, home, etc.  Based on the information you provided you would be entitled to your own exemption.
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