Solved: My child's grandma is custodian for an account. If determining if I need to file, do the Proceeds or Net Gain (after Cost) reported on the 1099-B count toward her income?
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abarhamand
New Member

My child's grandma is custodian for an account. If determining if I need to file, do the Proceeds or Net Gain (after Cost) reported on the 1099-B count toward her income?

My child is <10 years old. See attached 1099 summary. 1099-DIV shows ~$569 and 1099-B summary shows $0 in profit, so I originally assumed I did not have to file a separate tax return for my child.

However, the Summary of Proceeds, Gains & Losses is confusing. This shows Proceeds of ~$6,500 with a Net Gain of $875. Do I need to add either of these to the $569 to get her total income? If so, I believe I would need to file a return for her.

Second question would be: If a separate return is NOT necessary, am I right to assume that none of this information needs to be included on my tax return?

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Accepted Solutions
RichardG
New Member

My child's grandma is custodian for an account. If determining if I need to file, do the Proceeds or Net Gain (after Cost) reported on the 1099-B count toward her income?

The report shows three types of taxable income: dividends, short-term capital gain, and long-term capital gain.  Each type of income is reported separately in TurboTax.  Because your child has over $1,050 in investment income for the year, the income must be reported, either on a tax return for the child or on your tax return.

If a child under 19 or a full-time student age 19-23 has investment income of less than $10,500 consisting of ONLY interest, dividends, capital gains distributions and/or nontaxable distributions, you may elect to report the child's income on the parent's return.

This election is made on Form 8814, "Parents' Election to Report Child's Interest and Dividends." The first $1,050 of the child's investment income isn't subject to tax, the next $1,050 is subject to tax at 10%, and only the amount over $2,100 will be taxed at the parent's tax rate. There are qualifications that the parent must meet and some that the child must meet before this election is permitted.

Reporting a child's income on a parent's return is largely a convenience, though, rather than a real tax savings. The overall tax might be less if you file a tax return for the child separately instead of adding his or her income to your return.  If you choose to report the income on your tax return, go to Federal Taxes>Wages & Income>Less Common Income>Child's Income.

You should compare the two options and see which one results in the lower tax. Don't forget the state tax considerations, though, because this can make a significant difference to your overall tax savings. 


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3 Replies
RichardG
New Member

My child's grandma is custodian for an account. If determining if I need to file, do the Proceeds or Net Gain (after Cost) reported on the 1099-B count toward her income?

The report shows three types of taxable income: dividends, short-term capital gain, and long-term capital gain.  Each type of income is reported separately in TurboTax.  Because your child has over $1,050 in investment income for the year, the income must be reported, either on a tax return for the child or on your tax return.

If a child under 19 or a full-time student age 19-23 has investment income of less than $10,500 consisting of ONLY interest, dividends, capital gains distributions and/or nontaxable distributions, you may elect to report the child's income on the parent's return.

This election is made on Form 8814, "Parents' Election to Report Child's Interest and Dividends." The first $1,050 of the child's investment income isn't subject to tax, the next $1,050 is subject to tax at 10%, and only the amount over $2,100 will be taxed at the parent's tax rate. There are qualifications that the parent must meet and some that the child must meet before this election is permitted.

Reporting a child's income on a parent's return is largely a convenience, though, rather than a real tax savings. The overall tax might be less if you file a tax return for the child separately instead of adding his or her income to your return.  If you choose to report the income on your tax return, go to Federal Taxes>Wages & Income>Less Common Income>Child's Income.

You should compare the two options and see which one results in the lower tax. Don't forget the state tax considerations, though, because this can make a significant difference to your overall tax savings. 


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abarhamand
New Member

My child's grandma is custodian for an account. If determining if I need to file, do the Proceeds or Net Gain (after Cost) reported on the 1099-B count toward her income?

Thank you very much! Am I correct that $570+875 would be her total income? (i.e., I should ignore the "Proceeds" and focus on the "Net Gains"?) This would be more than the $1,050 minimum filing requirement but less than the $2,100 you quoted, so maybe there would be no difference in federal savings?
RichardG
New Member

My child's grandma is custodian for an account. If determining if I need to file, do the Proceeds or Net Gain (after Cost) reported on the 1099-B count toward her income?

The report shows $569.85 in dividends, $160.57 in short term gain, and $714.44 in long term gain for a total of $1444.86 in gross income.  The short-term gain is reported separately from the long term gain, please do not lump them together in TurboTax.
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