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psnkbasf
New Member

My husband and I each have an HSA and a HDHP. I cover myself and our children. He covers himself only. When I respond to reflect that, I am told that needs to be fixed. What am I doing wrong?

I tried the other possible responses.  Each response reflects a different federal refund or tax due.
1 Reply
AnnetteB
Intuit Alumni

My husband and I each have an HSA and a HDHP. I cover myself and our children. He covers himself only. When I respond to reflect that, I am told that needs to be fixed. What am I doing wrong?

You should go back through the Health Savings Account (HSA) section of your return to double check your entries for the High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP) coverage for 2016.

There is a special rule for married persons with multiple HDHP plans for the year.  If one person has family coverage while the other has self-only coverage, you both must check the box that you have family coverage.  This is because you will be subject to the maximum contribution amount that is equal to the family coverage amount. 

The following information from TurboTax help content will explain this in greater detail:

 

Taxpayers With Multiple Plans


Individual Policy and Family Policy
If either spouse has family coverage, both spouses are treated as having family coverage. You must change your coverage designation to "family" for both spouses. You should adjust your entries so that the person with self only coverage enters family coverage. Since you are both covered by HDHPs (High Deductible Health Plans) and are married, you are both considered as having family coverage for this form, even though one of you has self only coverage. The contribution limit is split equally between the spouses unless you agree on a different division.

Example 1: John has family HSA coverage from January 1 through December 31. His wife Jane has individual coverage January 1 through April 30. Because John has coverage on December 1st, he is considered to have coverage for the full year. They are each treated as having a high deductible family coverage under John's plan. John can contribute $3,375 (1/2 of the maximum contribution) to his HSA and Jane can contribute $3,375 (1/2 of the maximum contribution) to her HSA plan. They may divide the $6,750 maximum contribution between themselves as they like.

Two Family Policies
If each spouse has family coverage under a separate plan, both are treated as having family coverage. You must reduce the limit on contributions, before taking into account any additional contributions, by the amount contributed to both spouse's Archer MSAs. (This limitation is calculated for you.) After that reduction, the contribution limit is split equally between the spouses unless you agree on a different division.

Self and Family Plans at Different Times
If you were covered by a self-only HDHP and a family HDHP at different times during the year, check the box for the plan that was in effect for a longer period. If you were covered by both a self-only HDHP and a family HDHP at the same time, you are treated as having family coverage during that period.

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