Solved: I started working for a non-profit and I'm buying so much stuff for my office like a lamp, supplies, a fan etc. Can I save these receipts and write these off? Thanks!
Sign Up

Why sign in to the Community?

  • Submit a question
  • Check your notifications
or and start working on your taxes
Announcements
TurboTax has you covered during Covid. Get the latest second stimulus info here.
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
New Member

I started working for a non-profit and I'm buying so much stuff for my office like a lamp, supplies, a fan etc. Can I save these receipts and write these off? Thanks!

n/a
1 Best answer

Accepted Solutions
Level 15

I started working for a non-profit and I'm buying so much stuff for my office like a lamp, supplies, a fan etc. Can I save these receipts and write these off? Thanks!

To treat them as charitable donations, you must have a letter of acknowledgement from the organization (it does not have to attest to the value of the items, you'll use receipts for that),

And, the items have to become the property of the organization (you will not take them with you when you leave, and the organization could come by your desk and say "nice lamp, but I think that belongs in someone else's office".)

Alternatively, if you have expenses for your job (no matter who you work for) that are ordinary and customary for your type of work and are not reimbursed by the employer, you can take them as unreimbursed business expenses on form 2106. But this is subject to the 2% rule so the actual tax benefit will be limited, if you can claim it at all.

*Answers are correct to the best of my ability at the time of posting but do not constitute legal or tax advice.*

View solution in original post

1 Reply
Level 15

I started working for a non-profit and I'm buying so much stuff for my office like a lamp, supplies, a fan etc. Can I save these receipts and write these off? Thanks!

To treat them as charitable donations, you must have a letter of acknowledgement from the organization (it does not have to attest to the value of the items, you'll use receipts for that),

And, the items have to become the property of the organization (you will not take them with you when you leave, and the organization could come by your desk and say "nice lamp, but I think that belongs in someone else's office".)

Alternatively, if you have expenses for your job (no matter who you work for) that are ordinary and customary for your type of work and are not reimbursed by the employer, you can take them as unreimbursed business expenses on form 2106. But this is subject to the 2% rule so the actual tax benefit will be limited, if you can claim it at all.

*Answers are correct to the best of my ability at the time of posting but do not constitute legal or tax advice.*

View solution in original post

Dynamic Ads
v
Privacy Settings