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Kell23elis
New Member

Do I need to own my first house for a full year to qualify for home owner or buyer credits?

If not, how long do I need to own the property to qualify for any deduction or credits on my tax return?

I brought my first home in July 2018 so can I qualify for anything?

2 Replies
Vanessa
Level 3

Do I need to own my first house for a full year to qualify for home owner or buyer credits?

There are no homeowners credits.  This credit ended several years ago.  It is still showing in TurboTax because those who received it are now paying it back.

The only deduction for a homeowner is if you itemize, you can deduct mortgage interest, points and property taxes paid. Your total itemized expenses (mortgage interest, taxes, medical expenses, etc) would need to be greater than your standard deduction in order to qualify for this deduction. 

The Standard Deduction is as follows:

  • $12,000 Single or Married Filing Separate
  • $13,600 if single and over 65
  • $18,000 Head of Household
  • $24,000 Married Filing Jointly (add $1,300 per spouse over 65 years old)
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xmasbaby0
Level 15

Do I need to own my first house for a full year to qualify for home owner or buyer credits?


It is going to be very hard for a lot of people to use itemized deductions now that the standard deduction is so much higher.  Your home ownership may not have any effect on your tax due or refund, especially if you purchased the house late in the year.  

Standard Deduction
Your itemized deductions have to be more than your standard deduction before you will see a change in your tax owed or tax refund.  The deductions you enter do not necessarily count “dollar for dollar;” many of them are subject to meeting  tough thresholds—medical expenses, for example, must meet a threshold that is pretty hard to reach.  The software program uses all the IRS rules that apply to the expenses you enter, and it tells you if you have enough to use your itemized deductions or if using the standard deduction is more advantageous for you.  Under the new tax laws, some deductions have been capped—there is a $10,000 limit to the itemized deductions for state, local, property and sales taxes. 

2018 Standard Deductions:

Single   $12,000  (+ $1600 65 or older)

Married Filing Separately    $12,000  (+ $1300 65 or older)

Married Filing Jointly  $24,000  (+ $1300 each spouse 65 or older)

Head of Household  $18,000  (+ $1600 65 or older)

Home Ownership

There is not a first time home buyers credit on a Federal return. That ended in 2010. If your state has such as credit, you will be able to enter it when you prepare your state return.

Buying a home is not a guarantee of a big refund.  Your deductions for homeownership combined with your other deductions (if any) must exceed your standard deduction to change your tax due or refund. If you purchased your home late in the year, you do not even have a full year of home ownership deductions.

Your closing costs on your new home are not deductible except for prepaid interest, prepaid property tax or loan origination fees.  There are no deductions for appraisal, inspections, title searches, settlement fees. etc.

Your down payment is not deductible.

Your homeowners insurance for fire, hazard, flood, etc. is not deductible for your own home.

Home improvements, repairs, maintenance, etc. for your own home are not deductible.  

Homeowners Association  (HOA) fees for your own home are not deductible. 


**Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to offer the most correct information possible. The poster disclaims any legal responsibility for the accuracy of the information that is contained in this post.**
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