Where am I a resident? I live and work in one state. My driver license says my home state. Where I have not lived since starting college.
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Where am I a resident? I live and work in one state. My driver license says my home state. Where I have not lived since starting college.

 
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New Member

Where am I a resident? I live and work in one state. My driver license says my home state. Where I have not lived since starting college.

It's best to check with your State Department of Revenue for specific residency rules, especially as they apply to your particular situation. In the meantime, use the examples below as a general guideline.

Resident examples

Generally, you're a resident of a state if you don't intend to be there temporarily. It's where home is – where you come back to after being away on vacation, business trip, or school.

Think of it as your permanent home (for now), but don't confuse "permanent" with "forever." Nothing is forever.

Examples

  • You live in Idaho. Every November, you go to Arizona for the winter and return to Idaho in April. You're an Idaho resident.
  • You're a student at the University of Minnesota, originally from Indiana. After graduation, you plan to move back to Indiana, at least for the time being. You're an Indiana resident.
  • You quit your East Coast job and moved west, with no particular destination in mind. You end up in New Mexico, where you've been living for the past year. You're not sure you'll stay there – California beckons – but for now, it's your home. You're a New Mexico resident.
    • Note: This example isn't real obvious. The key is the word "moved" – you abandoned your previous state to move west – combined with New Mexico residency laws. A perfect example of why you should always defer to your state's residency rules if you're ever in doubt.
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