If my dad's on medical disability retirement from cal. state teachers ret. system and I have 1099-R for $5,900, how do I enter income. combined w2 & 1099-r inc=20,100?
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If my dad's on medical disability retirement from cal. state teachers ret. system and I have 1099-R for $5,900, how do I enter income. combined w2 & 1099-r inc=20,100?

 
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Level 7

If my dad's on medical disability retirement from cal. state teachers ret. system and I have 1099-R for $5,900, how do I enter income. combined w2 & 1099-r inc=20,100?

Enter the W-2 as a W-2. The 1099-R is entered later under Retirement Plans & Social Security. If your dad qualifies to have his retirement counted as earned income (because he's under the earliest normal CalSTRS retirement age, apparently 55), TurboTax will move it to the wage line of his 1040 when you enter that age, as asked in the questions after entering his 1099-R.

Though not clear, it looks like you may be trying to combine your W-2 with your dad's 1099-R. THAT IS A NO-NO! You and your dad MUST file separately, if at all. If he had no withholding on his 1099-R (and W-2 if any), he probably doesn't need to file unless his 1099-R counts as earned income (see above) and qualifies him for EITC (Federal and/or state).

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New Member

If my dad's on medical disability retirement from cal. state teachers ret. system and I have 1099-R for $5,900, how do I enter income. combined w2 & 1099-r inc=20,100?

Cal STRS issued 1099-R to my ss#. Thus, I have to enter it on my return not my dads, however, my question is that Turbo Tax questions are composing the questions as if it were my retirement. Basically, turbo is stating the questions as "you" vs "your dad.
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Level 7

If my dad's on medical disability retirement from cal. state teachers ret. system and I have 1099-R for $5,900, how do I enter income. combined w2 & 1099-r inc=20,100?

As far as TurboTax and the IRS are concerned, if it's a 1099-R with your SSN it *is* your retirement. However, you may wanna double check with CalSTRS and/or the IRS to see if that is correct. I know "representative payee" Social Security checks are still potentially income to the person earning the check (NOT the payee), but the law may work a bit differently for retirement.
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