Open TurboTax

Why sign in to the Community?

  • Submit a question
  • Check your notifications
or and start working on your taxes
Close icon
Do you have a TurboTax Online account?

We'll help you get started or pick up where you left off.

cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
ccodm96
New Member

If I am not planning to retire until 67 or at 70 when do I have to fill out paperwork for eventually receiving social security and Medicare. I am 63 now.

I am 63. If I do not wantt to start collecting as and Medicare until I am eligible or until 70, when do I have to fill out the paperwork. Thank You

2 Replies
Opus 17
Level 15

If I am not planning to retire until 67 or at 70 when do I have to fill out paperwork for eventually receiving social security and Medicare. I am 63 now.

You apply for social security and medicare separately.

 

Normally, you want to apply for Medicare 3 months before you turn 65, and it will take effect on the first day of the month in which you turn 65.  If you are working and have other medical insurance, you can delay taking Medicare, but there can be penalties and waiting periods if you sign up for medicare late, so you should review your options with an expert.

 

If your full retirement age is 67, you can apply then for your social security benefit even though you plan to continue working.  If you delay taking social security until you turn 70, your benefit would increase, but you would need to have a planner help you with the numbers to see how much benefit there would be of filing at 67 vs 70. 

*Answers are correct to the best of my ability at the time of posting but do not constitute legal or tax advice.*
xmasbaby0
Level 15

If I am not planning to retire until 67 or at 70 when do I have to fill out paperwork for eventually receiving social security and Medicare. I am 63 now.

When you are getting close to that 65th birthday you will automatically receive a Medicare card in the mail---that does not require you to start receiving Social Security----starting your benefits is a separate thing and you sign up with SS when you choose to do so.

**Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to offer the most correct information possible. The poster disclaims any legal responsibility for the accuracy of the information that is contained in this post.**

About Community

Learn about taxes, budgeting, saving, borrowing, reducing debt, investing, and planning for retirement.

3.48m
Members

2.6m
Discussions

Manage cookies
v