I received a settlement check from an insurance company after a car accident. I dont have a 1099. I have the breakdown of the settlement. Do I include on my return?
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I received a settlement check from an insurance company after a car accident. I dont have a 1099. I have the breakdown of the settlement. Do I include on my return?

I have been reading FAQ's on settlement checks but I want to be advised directly. I only have a breakdown of my settlement so I was hoping someone could review it with me.
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New Member

I received a settlement check from an insurance company after a car accident. I dont have a 1099. I have the breakdown of the settlement. Do I include on my return?

Physical Injury

If you receive a settlement for personal physical injuries or physical sickness and did not take an itemized deduction for medical expenses related to the injury or sickness in prior years, the full amount is non-taxable. Do not include the settlement proceeds in your income.

  • BUT

If you receive a settlement for personal physical injuries or physical sickness, and you did take and itemized deduction for Medical Expenses you must include in income that portion of the settlement that is for medical expenses you deducted in any prior year(s) to the extent the deduction(s) provided a tax benefit. If part of the proceeds is for medical expenses you paid in more than one year, you must allocate on a pro rata basis the part of the proceeds for medical expenses to each of the years you paid medical expenses. See Recoveries in Publication 525 for details on how to calculate the amount to report. The tax benefit amount should be reported as “Other Income” on line 21 of Form 1040.

Personal Property

Property settlements for loss in value of property that are less than the adjusted basis of your property are not taxable and generally do not need to be reported on your tax return. However, you must reduce your basis in the property by the amount of the settlement.

If the property settlement exceeds your adjusted basis in the property, the excess is income. For more information, see the Instructions for Schedule D, (Form 1040) Capital Gains and Losses and the Instructions for Form 4797, Sales of Business Property.

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