Does a 17 year old minor who is working and has a W-2 have to show Social Security death benefits from SSA-1099 on his return even though I am the representative payee?
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New Member

Does a 17 year old minor who is working and has a W-2 have to show Social Security death benefits from SSA-1099 on his return even though I am the representative payee?

 
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New Member

Does a 17 year old minor who is working and has a W-2 have to show Social Security death benefits from SSA-1099 on his return even though I am the representative payee?

The SSA-1099 would have the child's Social Security number on the form.  You do not report a dependent child's Social Security benefits received on your tax return.  If the child has no other income they do not report the benefits received on a tax return.

The type of Social Security benefits children receive when their parents are deceased is called survivors benefits. ... Survivors benefits are paid out on a tax-free basis. However, if children have work earnings or other taxable income, their total income could cause their benefits to become taxable.

If the child has another W-2 and needs to file because he made more than $6,350  then he can add the SSA-1099 to his return and mark that someone else can claim him (if you are someone else is claiming him).  

If you are not claiming him and he made more than $10,400, then he needs to file a return.

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New Member

Does a 17 year old minor who is working and has a W-2 have to show Social Security death benefits from SSA-1099 on his return even though I am the representative payee?

Hello, I have a 17-year-old that receives Survivors Benefits until she either/or turns 18 or graduates first. She is working so do I need to report her earned income to SSI?

Thank you

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Level 15

Does a 17 year old minor who is working and has a W-2 have to show Social Security death benefits from SSA-1099 on his return even though I am the representative payee?


@teresamorgan3169 wrote:

Hello, I have a 17-year-old that receives Survivors Benefits until she either/or turns 18 or graduates first. She is working so do I need to report her earned income to SSI?

Thank you


Her Social Security benefits reported on the SSA-1099 would only be reported on her tax return.  Any amount of earned income she has would only be entered on her tax return.  Depending on the amount of earned income she has, some of the SS benefits may be taxable.  If she is being claimed as your dependent then if she does file a tax return make sure that she indicates on her tax return that she can be claimed as a dependent.

 

Up to 85% of Social Security Retirement/Disability/Survivors benefits becomes taxable when all your other income plus 1/2 your social security reaches:

  • Married Filing Jointly - $32,000
  • Single or Head of Household - $25,000
  • Married Filing Separately - 0
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New Member

Does a 17 year old minor who is working and has a W-2 have to show Social Security death benefits from SSA-1099 on his return even though I am the representative payee?

Thank you, She works fast food and she says that she didn't fill out any tax forms from her job. is that right? And I haven't signed anything for her.   I am an independent contractor I don't get taxes taken out of my pay, I have to pay my own taxes and 2019 will be the first year that my daughter and I will be filing taxes.  This as all new to me so any advice will be taken to heart. Thank you & God Bless

Teresa Morgan

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Level 15

Does a 17 year old minor who is working and has a W-2 have to show Social Security death benefits from SSA-1099 on his return even though I am the representative payee?

Ok ... you believe your teen when they say they didn't fill in a W-4 at work and they are getting a paycheck ?  Check with the employer if you must or simply look at paycheck stub to see if taxes are being withheld.

 

Next, if they receive SS benefits due to a death you do not need to alert SS that they are working HOWEVER  the SS benefits are included on the child's tax return because they are the child's benefits not yours even if you are the adult payee for the child.  Now unless the child earns more than $ 12,200 for the year none of the SS benefits will be taxable.  

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