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famouswhisper17
Level 2

Unable to e-file for an extension. I do not owe the IRS, but I still need an extension. Do I have other options?

 
1 Best answer

Accepted Solutions
xmasbaby0
Level 15

Unable to e-file for an extension. I do not owe the IRS, but I still need an extension. Do I have other options?

@famouswhisper17 I see in your other thread that your problem is that you have not yet received your baby's SSN, and you want that so you can claim your child on your tax return.  Critter suggested going on extension if needed in order to wait until October if getting that SSN card takes longer than usual.  If you are getting a tax refund, you do not need an extension---there is no penalty for filing late if you do not owe or if you are getting a refund. You have three years to file a return when you are getting a refund.   If you owe, then you need to pay estimated tax by the July 15 deadline--the extension would just give you more time to file the Form 1040.

 

 

What you want to avoid is filing without entering your child as a dependent and then having to amend later, because amending and getting the refund for the amended return takes months.

 

You say your spouse cannot find his 2018 AGI.  Not sure what finding his AGI has to do with filing an extension--the extension form does not require his AGI.  You need the 2018  AGI to e-file a 2019 tax return.  Between now and whenever you file the 2019 return--you have time to find it. If you filed a joint return for 2018 the AGI is the same for both of you anyway.   If you cannot file by October 15, 2020, your tax return will have to be mailed and by then the AGI will be irrelevant, since you only need it to e-file.

 

Please read below to get an understanding of how filing separate returns would affect your child-related credits.

 

 

 

If you were legally married at the end of 2019 your filing choices are married filing jointly or married filing separately.

Married Filing Jointly is usually better, even if one spouse had little or no income. When you file a joint return, you and your spouse will get the married filing jointly standard deduction of $24,400 (+$1300 for each spouse 65 or older)  You are eligible for more credits including education credits, earned income credit, child and dependent care credit, and a larger income limit to receive the child tax credit.

 

If you choose to file married filing separately, both spouses have to file the same way—either you both itemize or you both use standard deduction. Your tax rate will be higher than on a joint return. Some of the special rules for filing separately include: you cannot get earned income credit, education credits, adoption credits, or deductions for student loan interest. A higher percent of your Social Security benefits may be taxable. Your limit for SALT (state and local taxes and sales tax) will be only $5000 per spouse. In many cases you will not be able to take the child and dependent care credit. The amount you can contribute to a retirement account will be affected. If you live in a community property state, you will be required to provide additional information regarding your spouse’s income. ( Community property states:  AZ, CA, ID, LA, NV, NM, TX, WA, WI)

If  you are using online TurboTax to prepare your returns, you will need to prepare two separate returns and pay twice.

 

https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1894449-married-filing-jointly-vs-married-filing-separately

https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1901162-married-filing-separately-in-community-property-states

https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1894449-is-it-better-for-a-married-couple-to-file-jointly-or-separ...

 

 

You asked about filing separate returns instead of joint---do not do that, or you lose child-related credits. that you would most likely want to receive.

**Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to offer the most correct information possible. The poster disclaims any legal responsibility for the accuracy of the information that is contained in this post.**

View solution in original post

7 Replies
Anonymous
Not applicable

Unable to e-file for an extension. I do not owe the IRS, but I still need an extension. Do I have other options?

 
Anonymous
Not applicable

Unable to e-file for an extension. I do not owe the IRS, but I still need an extension. Do I have other options?

why are you unable to e-file for an extension?    do you get an error message.? if so and you tell us the reject message maybe we can help.   other methods include printing and mailing in form 4868.

here's a link to the form.  note that the due date in the instructions is wrong. it should be 7/15/2020.

https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f4868.pdf

 

you can use this link to get to the freefile website to e-file your extension only

https://www.freefilefillableforms.com/#/fd/EconomicImpactPayment

famouswhisper17
Level 2

Unable to e-file for an extension. I do not owe the IRS, but I still need an extension. Do I have other options?

Thank you @Anonymous for the links.

I cannot e-file for an extension is because my husband is unable to locate his 2018 AGI or the return itself.

We married and had a baby in 2019. Should we file separate? My last post was about never receiving my baby's SSC. Since I have my AGI needed to efile for an extension by myself. Can he go ahead and file for 2019 individually? Then when I finally have our daughters SSN I can file? Can married couples file individually?

fanfare
Level 15

Unable to e-file for an extension. I do not owe the IRS, but I still need an extension. Do I have other options?

You don’t need to file Form 4868 if you make a payment using the IRS electronic payment options. 
===
You can pay all or part of your estimated income tax due and **indicate that the payment is for an extension** using Direct Pay, the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System, or using a credit or debit card. Your extension is then automatically granted. Any amount (even $5.00) will do.

xmasbaby0
Level 15

Unable to e-file for an extension. I do not owe the IRS, but I still need an extension. Do I have other options?

@famouswhisper17 I see in your other thread that your problem is that you have not yet received your baby's SSN, and you want that so you can claim your child on your tax return.  Critter suggested going on extension if needed in order to wait until October if getting that SSN card takes longer than usual.  If you are getting a tax refund, you do not need an extension---there is no penalty for filing late if you do not owe or if you are getting a refund. You have three years to file a return when you are getting a refund.   If you owe, then you need to pay estimated tax by the July 15 deadline--the extension would just give you more time to file the Form 1040.

 

 

What you want to avoid is filing without entering your child as a dependent and then having to amend later, because amending and getting the refund for the amended return takes months.

 

You say your spouse cannot find his 2018 AGI.  Not sure what finding his AGI has to do with filing an extension--the extension form does not require his AGI.  You need the 2018  AGI to e-file a 2019 tax return.  Between now and whenever you file the 2019 return--you have time to find it. If you filed a joint return for 2018 the AGI is the same for both of you anyway.   If you cannot file by October 15, 2020, your tax return will have to be mailed and by then the AGI will be irrelevant, since you only need it to e-file.

 

Please read below to get an understanding of how filing separate returns would affect your child-related credits.

 

 

 

If you were legally married at the end of 2019 your filing choices are married filing jointly or married filing separately.

Married Filing Jointly is usually better, even if one spouse had little or no income. When you file a joint return, you and your spouse will get the married filing jointly standard deduction of $24,400 (+$1300 for each spouse 65 or older)  You are eligible for more credits including education credits, earned income credit, child and dependent care credit, and a larger income limit to receive the child tax credit.

 

If you choose to file married filing separately, both spouses have to file the same way—either you both itemize or you both use standard deduction. Your tax rate will be higher than on a joint return. Some of the special rules for filing separately include: you cannot get earned income credit, education credits, adoption credits, or deductions for student loan interest. A higher percent of your Social Security benefits may be taxable. Your limit for SALT (state and local taxes and sales tax) will be only $5000 per spouse. In many cases you will not be able to take the child and dependent care credit. The amount you can contribute to a retirement account will be affected. If you live in a community property state, you will be required to provide additional information regarding your spouse’s income. ( Community property states:  AZ, CA, ID, LA, NV, NM, TX, WA, WI)

If  you are using online TurboTax to prepare your returns, you will need to prepare two separate returns and pay twice.

 

https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1894449-married-filing-jointly-vs-married-filing-separately

https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1901162-married-filing-separately-in-community-property-states

https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1894449-is-it-better-for-a-married-couple-to-file-jointly-or-separ...

 

 

You asked about filing separate returns instead of joint---do not do that, or you lose child-related credits. that you would most likely want to receive.

**Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to offer the most correct information possible. The poster disclaims any legal responsibility for the accuracy of the information that is contained in this post.**

View solution in original post

famouswhisper17
Level 2

Unable to e-file for an extension. I do not owe the IRS, but I still need an extension. Do I have other options?

What a great answer. Thank you.

 

On turbo tax, I selected the option to file extension. I'm prompted to enter my info and my husband's. Then, it wants to know if we did or did not file jointly per 2018. Did not. The next selection wants to know if I have the return or the transcript from 2018 or the AGI and if or what my husband has as well. He tried and cabt find 2018's return. The fact that since I'm expecting a refund, I have 3 years to file gives me much comfort. I was afraid of losing out. Thank you again for great feedback I feel much better.

xmasbaby0
Level 15

Unable to e-file for an extension. I do not owe the IRS, but I still need an extension. Do I have other options?

@famouswhisper17 You are welcome.  As for finding your spouse's 2018 return/AGI.  You do not say if he used TurboTax for his 2018 return,  If he did , he can try the account recovery tool to find the return.  If not, he can get a free transcript of the return from the IRS.

 

Many people have multiple TT accounts and forget how to access them.  Log out of the account you are in now.

 

Account recovery

https://myturbotax.intuit.com/account-recovery/

https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1901535-forgot-your-turbotax-online-user-id-or-password

Or did you use the desktop version of TurboTax?  If so, the files are on your own hard drive or any backup device you used like a flash drive.

 

https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1901486-how-many-turbotax-accounts-do-i-have

https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1901535

https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1901659-find-your-tax-data-file-in-mac

https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1900721-find-your-tax-data-file-tax-file-in-windows

 

To get a copy of your previously filed returns prepared with online TurboTax https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1900748-how-do-i-get-a-copy-of-a-return-i-filed-in-turbotax-online

 

 

 

You can get a free transcript from the IRS:   

https://www.irs.gov/individuals/get-transcript

**Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to offer the most correct information possible. The poster disclaims any legal responsibility for the accuracy of the information that is contained in this post.**
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