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thomas-noonan
New Member

My son is now 22, was a full time student in 2016, but graduated, got a job, and filed a tax return claiming an exemption. Can I still claim him?

He was a full time student and graduated in May 2016. He lived with me for more than half the year, and did not pay for any of his expenses. It says he now has to amend his return, or that I need to delete him from my return and cannot claim him as a dependant. The message I received about the rejection also stated I could not e-file, but could file by mail. Does my son still need to amend his return if I do this? What if he already filed, and received his return? Thank you.
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Accepted Solutions
Zbucklyo
Level 9

My son is now 22, was a full time student in 2016, but graduated, got a job, and filed a tax return claiming an exemption. Can I still claim him?

If your son does not amend his return, and you file by mail claiming him as a dependent, your return should be processed as normal.  However, at some point in the future (and it may be a year from now), the IRS will send you both correspondence which will enable them to determine which one of you actually should get the exemption for your son.  Whoever does not will lose the exemption and may owe additional taxes.

If you believe you should get the exemption (it appears that you should from what you stated), he should amend his return now.  You will still have to file your return by mail to claim the exemption from him, but this will avoid the correspondence from the IRS.

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1 Reply
Zbucklyo
Level 9

My son is now 22, was a full time student in 2016, but graduated, got a job, and filed a tax return claiming an exemption. Can I still claim him?

If your son does not amend his return, and you file by mail claiming him as a dependent, your return should be processed as normal.  However, at some point in the future (and it may be a year from now), the IRS will send you both correspondence which will enable them to determine which one of you actually should get the exemption for your son.  Whoever does not will lose the exemption and may owe additional taxes.

If you believe you should get the exemption (it appears that you should from what you stated), he should amend his return now.  You will still have to file your return by mail to claim the exemption from him, but this will avoid the correspondence from the IRS.

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