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readytolearn
Level 2

My brother doesn't qualify as a dependent on my Federal return, but TurboTax MI state return counted him as a dependent. Is this correct?

 
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MichaelMc
New Member

My brother doesn't qualify as a dependent on my Federal return, but TurboTax MI state return counted him as a dependent. Is this correct?

That would depend on why he failed to qualify as a dependent on your federal tax return.

Briefly, the federal rules for claiming dependents fall into two categories:

Qualifying child

  • They are related to you;
  • They aren't claimed as a dependent by someone else;
  • They are a U.S. citizen, resident alien, U.S. national, or a Canadian or Mexican resident.
  • They aren’t filing a joint return with their spouse or are filing a joint return only to claim a refund of withheld income tax or estimated tax paid;
  • They are under the age of 19, or 24 if a full-time student;
    • No age limit for permanently and totally disabled children.
  • They live with you for more than half the year (temporary absences from your home, while living at school, still count as time living with you); and
  • They didn't provide more than half of their own support for the year.

A new requirement this year is that each qualifying child dependent must have a Social Security Number, issued before the due date of your tax return (including extensions) to be claimed for the Child Tax Credit.

Qualifying relative

  • They don't have to be related to you (despite the name).
  • They aren't claimed as a dependent by someone else.
  • They are a U.S. citizen, resident alien, national, or a Canadian or Mexican resident.
  • They aren’t filing a joint return with their spouse.
  • They are related to you or lived with you the entire year as a member of your household.
  • They made less than $4,150 in 2018.
  • You provided more than half of their financial support.
It is entirely possible that your state has slightly different rules, so that a qualifying relative who, for example, failed by making too much income for the federal return might qualify on your state return if the state income standard is different.

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1 Reply
MichaelMc
New Member

My brother doesn't qualify as a dependent on my Federal return, but TurboTax MI state return counted him as a dependent. Is this correct?

That would depend on why he failed to qualify as a dependent on your federal tax return.

Briefly, the federal rules for claiming dependents fall into two categories:

Qualifying child

  • They are related to you;
  • They aren't claimed as a dependent by someone else;
  • They are a U.S. citizen, resident alien, U.S. national, or a Canadian or Mexican resident.
  • They aren’t filing a joint return with their spouse or are filing a joint return only to claim a refund of withheld income tax or estimated tax paid;
  • They are under the age of 19, or 24 if a full-time student;
    • No age limit for permanently and totally disabled children.
  • They live with you for more than half the year (temporary absences from your home, while living at school, still count as time living with you); and
  • They didn't provide more than half of their own support for the year.

A new requirement this year is that each qualifying child dependent must have a Social Security Number, issued before the due date of your tax return (including extensions) to be claimed for the Child Tax Credit.

Qualifying relative

  • They don't have to be related to you (despite the name).
  • They aren't claimed as a dependent by someone else.
  • They are a U.S. citizen, resident alien, national, or a Canadian or Mexican resident.
  • They aren’t filing a joint return with their spouse.
  • They are related to you or lived with you the entire year as a member of your household.
  • They made less than $4,150 in 2018.
  • You provided more than half of their financial support.
It is entirely possible that your state has slightly different rules, so that a qualifying relative who, for example, failed by making too much income for the federal return might qualify on your state return if the state income standard is different.

View solution in original post

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