Solved: I was divorced in September 2017, how do I file my taxes?
Sign Up

Why sign in to the Community?

  • Submit a question
  • Check your notifications
or and start working on your taxes
Announcements
TurboTax has you covered during Covid. Get the latest second stimulus info here.
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
New Member

I was divorced in September 2017, how do I file my taxes?

 
1 Best answer

Accepted Solutions
Level 2

I was divorced in September 2017, how do I file my taxes?

You will file as Single, or if you have qualifying dependents, you may be able to file as Head of Household.

Here’s a list from the IRS of the five filing statuses:

  1. Single. Normally this status is for taxpayers who aren’t married, or who are divorced or legally separated under state law.
  2. Married Filing Jointly. If taxpayers are married, they can file a joint tax return. If a spouse died in 2017, the widowed spouse can often file a joint return for that year.
  3. Married Filing Separately. A married couple can choose to file two separate tax returns. This may benefit them if it results in less tax owed than if they file a joint tax return. Taxpayers may want to prepare their taxes both ways before they choose. They can also use this status if each wants to be responsible only for their own tax.
  4. Head of Household. In most cases, this status applies to a taxpayer who is not married, but there are some special rules. For example, the taxpayer must have paid more than half the cost of keeping up a home for themselves and a qualifying person. Don’t choose this status by mistake. Be sure to check all the rules.
  5. Qualifying Widow(er) with Dependent Child. This status may apply to a taxpayer if their spouse died during 2015 or 2016 and they have a dependent child. Other conditions also apply.

View solution in original post

1 Reply
Level 2

I was divorced in September 2017, how do I file my taxes?

You will file as Single, or if you have qualifying dependents, you may be able to file as Head of Household.

Here’s a list from the IRS of the five filing statuses:

  1. Single. Normally this status is for taxpayers who aren’t married, or who are divorced or legally separated under state law.
  2. Married Filing Jointly. If taxpayers are married, they can file a joint tax return. If a spouse died in 2017, the widowed spouse can often file a joint return for that year.
  3. Married Filing Separately. A married couple can choose to file two separate tax returns. This may benefit them if it results in less tax owed than if they file a joint tax return. Taxpayers may want to prepare their taxes both ways before they choose. They can also use this status if each wants to be responsible only for their own tax.
  4. Head of Household. In most cases, this status applies to a taxpayer who is not married, but there are some special rules. For example, the taxpayer must have paid more than half the cost of keeping up a home for themselves and a qualifying person. Don’t choose this status by mistake. Be sure to check all the rules.
  5. Qualifying Widow(er) with Dependent Child. This status may apply to a taxpayer if their spouse died during 2015 or 2016 and they have a dependent child. Other conditions also apply.

View solution in original post

Dynamic Ads
v
Privacy Settings