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hollylesly
New Member

I want to get a head start on my taxes for 2017. How can I do that?

 
1 Best answer

Accepted Solutions
SweetieJean
Level 15

I want to get a head start on my taxes for 2017. How can I do that?

Tax laws for 2017 might change, so keep that in mind.  You can create an account and prepare a "fake" return that you do not file.  Whatever you do, do NOT mess with your previously prepared tax return.

TT 2017 will be available in late Nov or early Dec.

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6 Replies
SweetieJean
Level 15

I want to get a head start on my taxes for 2017. How can I do that?

Tax laws for 2017 might change, so keep that in mind.  You can create an account and prepare a "fake" return that you do not file.  Whatever you do, do NOT mess with your previously prepared tax return.

TT 2017 will be available in late Nov or early Dec.

hollylesly
New Member

I want to get a head start on my taxes for 2017. How can I do that?

I would like to get a jump start on filing for my son before his father does as he has violated a court order for the last 8 years by claiming him whenever he wasn't supposed to. Therefore I was wondering how early I could begin the process as well as if it will save the information that I have submitted
rjs
Level 15
Level 15

I want to get a head start on my taxes for 2017. How can I do that?

The TurboTax CD/Download software for 2017 will be available in mid to late November. TurboTax Online for 2017 will be available sometime in December. If you sign up for TurboTax Advantage you will be among the first to get the software when it is released. (When you sign up, make sure you are signing up for 2017, not 2018.)

But the IRS won't start accepting tax returns until sometime in January, and you can't file until you get all your W-2s, 1099s, etc. The issuers have until January 31 to send out those forms. If the father has consistently violated the court order, a better solution would probably be to talk to your lawyer about getting the court to enforce the order, rather than trying to race every year to file your tax return before the father does.

Are you the custodial parent? (Does your son live with you more than half the year?) If so, have you been claiming your son even though the father also claims him, or did you just give up? The IRS will not enforce the court order, but if you and the father both claim your son, the IRS will give the exemption to the custodial parent (unless the custodial parent has released the exemption to the noncustodial parent).
Hal_Al
Level 15

I want to get a head start on my taxes for 2017. How can I do that?

If someone else claimed your child inappropriately, and if they file first, your return will be rejected if e-filed. You would then need to file a return on paper, claiming the child as  appropriate. The IRS will process your return and send you your refund, in the normal time. Shortly (up to a year) thereafter, you'll receive a letter from the IRS, stating that your child was claimed on another return. It will tell you that if you made a mistake to file an amended return and if you didn't make a mistake to do nothing. The other party will get the same letter you did. If one of you doesn't file an amended return, unclaiming the child, the next letter, from the IRS, will require you to provide proof. Be sure to reply in a timely manner.
Winner gets the tax benefits; loser gets to pay the IRS back with penalties and interest.  The custodial parent almost always wins. The non-custodial parent can only claim the child as a dependent if the custodial parent gives permission (on form 8332) or if it's spelled out in a pre 2009 divorce decree.   
<a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="https://www.thebalance.com/claiming-same-dependent-audit-risk-3193030">https://www.thebalance.com/cl...>

If you failed to claim the child, in the past, because the Ex beat you to it, you can still file amended returns for 2014, 2015 and 2016  and claim the child
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
There is a way to split the tax benefits. For future negotiations with the other parent (and maybe even for this year) the following info may be of use:
There is a special rule in the case of divorced & separated (including never married) parents. When the non-custodial parent is claiming the child as a dependent/exemption/child tax credit; the custodial parent is still allowed to claim the same child for Earned Income Credit, Head of Household filing status, and day care credit. This "splitting of the child" is not available to parents who lived together at any time during the last 6 months of the year; then only one of you can claim the child for any tax reasons. The tax benefits may not be split in any other manner.

Note in particular that the non-custodial parent can never claim the Earned Income Credit, Head of Household filing status or the day care credit, based on that child, even when the custodial parent has released the exemption to him.
Hal_Al
Level 15

I want to get a head start on my taxes for 2017. How can I do that?

You can't.

If you use the download version of TurboTax (TT), instead of online, you can do a preliminary on your 2016 software by making a copy of your 2016 return and manipulating the numbers. It will not be exact because it has 2016 tax tables and thresholds, but it will be very close. But it cannot  be transferred to the 2017 software. You will still have to re-enter the info when you get the 2017 software.

hollylesly
New Member

I want to get a head start on my taxes for 2017. How can I do that?

Thank you for your information. I guess its just a waiting game from here.

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