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hollystudentemai
New Member

I live in the state of Illinois and recently donated some of my eggs for IVF. No one can clearly tell me whether I need to pay taxes on the money I received or not. Help?

One organization made me fill out a W-9 form to be able to donate. The other organizations I've worked with can't tell me what kind or if I need to fill out a form for taxes. I also don't know how much money I should set aside if I do have to pay taxes on it. This year, I will have received $30,000 from all the donations.
3 Replies
Mike9241
Level 15

I live in the state of Illinois and recently donated some of my eggs for IVF. No one can clearly tell me whether I need to pay taxes on the money I received or not. Help?

see this thread. the answer is yes the income is taxable. since Illinois starts out with federal adjusted gross income and there is no subtraction for this type of income. the money will be taxed. Regardless of whether you get a 1099 or not you must report all the money received.

https://ttlc.intuit.com/community/retirement/discussion/egg-donation-tax-reporting-roth-ira-eligibil... 

TomD8
Level 15

I live in the state of Illinois and recently donated some of my eggs for IVF. No one can clearly tell me whether I need to pay taxes on the money I received or not. Help?

Compensation for egg donation is definitely taxable income.  With donation income of $30,000, you will want to make estimated tax payments to both the IRS and the State of Illinois, since your income will be reported to you on a 1099 with no taxes withheld.

**Answers are correct to the best of my ability but do not constitute tax or legal advice.
Opus 17
Level 15

I live in the state of Illinois and recently donated some of my eggs for IVF. No one can clearly tell me whether I need to pay taxes on the money I received or not. Help?

I agree, it's taxable, sorry.

 

It's "miscellaneous" or "other" income, similar to hobby income or gambling prizes.  It is not compensation from working, and you are not a business, you don't use schedule C and you don't pay self-employment tax.  You can't deduct any expenses you might have had.  

 

Your "other income" is reported in Turbotax and on your tax form and is subject to the same regular income taxes as wages.   It's included on your regular tax return (form 1040) at the end of the year, not a separate form.

 

However, because you did not have withholding, you will need to make an estimated tax payment to the IRS and your state government.  If you owe a large tax amount when you file your return, you can be assessed an underpayment penalty, even if you pay in full when you file.  Depending on your other income and what state you live in, I suggest a 5% payment to your state and a 20% payment to the IRS.  That may not be enough to cover all the taxes, so you may still owe at the end of the year, but it will be enough to prevent paying a penalty.  If you want to intentionally overpay your estimate, and get the extra back as a refund, then pay 25% to the IRS and 10% to your state.

 

Estimated tax payments to the IRS can be made electronically at www.irs.gov/payments.  Be sure to select "2022 estimated taxes" as the reason.  Your state should have a similar web site for payments. 

*Answers are correct to the best of my ability at the time of posting but do not constitute legal or tax advice.*
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