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lejeanson
New Member

I am a grad student living in a state other than my permanent residence.Do I need to claim residency in the school's state even though I have no intentions of staying?

I moved from my home state where I live with my parents to another state to attend Grad school where i work part time and live off campus. Do I need to claim residency in the school's state even though i am only here because I am a student and I do not intend to stay in this state after school?

3 Replies
ChristinaS
New Member

I am a grad student living in a state other than my permanent residence.Do I need to claim residency in the school's state even though I have no intentions of staying?

Probably not. But are you a dependent of your parents, and what state are we talking about? (i.e. what state is the school in)
lejeanson
New Member

I am a grad student living in a state other than my permanent residence.Do I need to claim residency in the school's state even though I have no intentions of staying?

I am not a dependent of my parents. I moved from SD to MN for school
ChristinaS
New Member

I am a grad student living in a state other than my permanent residence.Do I need to claim residency in the school's state even though I have no intentions of staying?

Not all states have the same rules.

You are most likely a resident of Minnesota for tax purposes. See below.

Nonresidents If you were a resident of another state but lived in Minnesota, file a Minnesota income tax return as a Minnesota resident if both of these conditions applied to you:

• You were in Minnesota for 183 days or more during the tax year

• You or your spouse owned, rented, lived in, or leased an abode (house, townhouse, condominium, apartment, mobile home, or cabin, with cooking and bathing facilities in Minnesota, that could be lived in year-round)

If both conditions apply, you are considered a Minnesota resident for the length of time you maintained an abode in Minnesota.

See page 5-6:

http://www.revenue.state.mn.us/Forms_and_Instructions/m1_inst_16.pdf

Either way, you'd have a Minnesota return if you worked there. But you are likely considered a resident. Because South Dakota doesn't have a tax, there's no conflict there.

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