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yukii007
New Member

Just Retired Can I open IRA age 62

Can I contribute to an IRA now that I retired at age 62 until age 70. 

Never had IRA before as I just inherited funds.

Does that make sense?

3 Replies
macuser_22
Level 15

Just Retired Can I open IRA age 62

Sure as long as you have taxable compensation (money that you work for) to support a contribution.

 

The most you can contribute to all of your traditional and Roth IRAs is the smaller of:

For 2018, $5,500, or $6,500 if you’re age 50 or older by the end of the year; or
your taxable compensation for the year.
For 2019, $6,000, or $7,000 if you’re age 50 or older by the end of the year; or
your taxable compensation for the year.  There is not age limit to contribute to a Roth IRA and the Traditional IRA age limit is removed in 2020 and beyond.

(Taxable compensation is generally wages that you worked for - W-2 or net self-employed income minus the deducible part of the SE tax, but can include commissions, alimony and separate maintenance, and nontaxable combat pay ).

See this IRS article for Roth contribution limits:

https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/roth-iras

**Disclaimer: This post is for discussion purposes only and is NOT tax advice. The author takes no responsibility for the accuracy of any information in this post.**
yukii007
New Member

Just Retired Can I open IRA age 62

Would capitals gains, interest and div be considered Taxable compensation?

macuser_22
Level 15

Just Retired Can I open IRA age 62

No.  

 

See IRS Pub 590A "What is Compensation":

https://www.irs.gov/publications/p590a#en_US_2018_publink1000230355

 

What Is Compensation?

Generally, compensation is what you earn from working. For a summary of what compensation does and doesn’t include, see Table 1-1. Compensation includes all of the items discussed next (even if you have more than one type).

Wages, salaries, etc.

Wages, salaries, tips, professional fees, bonuses, and other amounts you receive for providing personal services are compensation. The IRS treats as compensation any amount properly shown in box 1 (Wages, tips, other compensation) of Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, provided that amount is reduced by any amount properly shown in box 11 (Nonqualified plans). Scholarship and fellowship payments are compensation for IRA purposes only if shown in box 1 of Form W-2.

Commissions.

An amount you receive that is a percentage of profits or sales price is compensation.

Self-employment income.

If you are self-employed (a sole proprietor or a partner), compensation is the net earnings from your trade or business (provided your personal services are a material income-producing factor) reduced by the total of:

  • The deduction for contributions made on your behalf to retirement plans, and

  • The deduction allowed for the deductible part of your self-employment taxes.

 

Compensation includes earnings from self-employment even if they aren’t subject to self-employment tax because of your religious beliefs.

Self-employment loss.

If you have a net loss from self-employment, don’t subtract the loss from your salaries or wages when figuring your total compensation.

Alimony and separate maintenance.

For IRA purposes, compensation includes any taxable alimony and separate maintenance payments you receive under a decree of divorce or separate maintenance.

Nontaxable combat pay.

If you were a member of the U.S. Armed Forces, compensation includes any nontaxable combat pay you received. This amount should be reported in box 12 of your 2018 Form W-2 with code Q.

 

**Disclaimer: This post is for discussion purposes only and is NOT tax advice. The author takes no responsibility for the accuracy of any information in this post.**
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