turbotax icon
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
turbotax icon
turbotax icon
turbotax icon
turbotax icon
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Close icon
Do you have a TurboTax Online account?

We'll help you get started or pick up where you left off.

avlis53
New Member

I am a California Resident, I also have rental income for property in Washington State. Can/Do I exclude Washington income from California return? If so how is this accomplished?

For Same situation, if WA income is to be reported in CA reture, is there any specific steps needed in order to take advantage of depreciation and WA business costs as applied to CA state return?
Connect with an expert
x
Do you have an Intuit account?

Do you have an Intuit account?

You'll need to sign in or create an account to connect with an expert.

1 Best answer

Accepted Solutions

I am a California Resident, I also have rental income for property in Washington State. Can/Do I exclude Washington income from California return? If so how is this accomplished?

As another SuperUser "SweetieJean" reminded me before I had my morning coffee, Washington has no state income tax.  So, as a California resident your Washington-sourced rental income will be fully taxed by California.  Remember that depreciation is one among the many "expenses" associated with a rental, and it is the net rental income (after expenses) that is taxed.  Your federal Schedule E for your rental is used by both federal and California tax returns to determine your taxable net rental income.

(Sorry SJ -- I accidently trashed your comment)

View solution in original post

1 Reply

I am a California Resident, I also have rental income for property in Washington State. Can/Do I exclude Washington income from California return? If so how is this accomplished?

As another SuperUser "SweetieJean" reminded me before I had my morning coffee, Washington has no state income tax.  So, as a California resident your Washington-sourced rental income will be fully taxed by California.  Remember that depreciation is one among the many "expenses" associated with a rental, and it is the net rental income (after expenses) that is taxed.  Your federal Schedule E for your rental is used by both federal and California tax returns to determine your taxable net rental income.

(Sorry SJ -- I accidently trashed your comment)
Use your Intuit Account to sign in to TurboTax.
By selecting Sign in, you agree to our Terms and acknowledge our Privacy Statement.
message box icon

Get more help

Ask questions and learn more about your taxes and finances.

Post your Question

Related Content

Manage cookies