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Kevin McConnell
Returning Member

Moving from CA to TX in 2022

RE = Real Estate

 

Currently live in CA, already purchased land in TX, which I will pay RE taxes in 2021.

 

How do I claim the TX RE Taxes for 2021?

 

I will build a house on this land and move there in 2022, at what point do I need to claim TX resident to avoid paying CA taxes?

 

In 2022, this will be my primary residence, but I will also have my home in CA as a second home and will pay RE taxes.

 

3 Replies
JaniceS_CPA_CFP
Employee Tax & Finance Expert

Moving from CA to TX in 2022

Congratulations on the upcoming move. 

 

For federal tax purposes you can claim both the CA real estate taxes and TX real estate taxes as an itemize deduction. 

 

For CA taxes, you can file as a part year resident in 2022 if you move from your home in California to Texas.  

 

A part-year resident is any individual who is a California
resident for part of the year and a nonresident for part of
the year.

 

Regarding income taxed by California, see below 

 

Residents of California are taxed on ALL income,
including income from sources outside California.


Nonresidents of California are taxed only on income
from California sources. 


Part-year residents of California are taxed on all income
received while a resident and only on income from
California sources while a nonresident.

Click here for more information 

 

Hope this helps! 

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ee-ea
Level 15

Moving from CA to TX in 2022

There are no personal inome taxes in TX.

JaniceS_CPA_CFP
Employee Tax & Finance Expert

Moving from CA to TX in 2022

I was referring to real estate taxes in Texas. Those are an itemized deduction. 

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