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adesiree333
New Member

If i made $3000 this year as my income how much should i get back for claiming my 4 month old son? i was hospitalized rest of the year so couldnt work anymore

 
2 Replies
HelenaC
New Member

If i made $3000 this year as my income how much should i get back for claiming my 4 month old son? i was hospitalized rest of the year so couldnt work anymore

It's hard to say exactly how much you will get back but if you file single with one child, you may be eligible for $2,029:

  • Earned income tax credit of $1,029
  • Additional Child Tax Credit $1,000

Use the TurboTax Free edition to get an exact refund amount. Click on TurboTax® Free Edition - 100% Free Tax Filing | Pay Nothing $0 - Intuit

Hal_Al
Level 15

If i made $3000 this year as my income how much should i get back for claiming my 4 month old son? i was hospitalized rest of the year so couldnt work anymore

  •  you may be eligible for $1,104:

    • Earned income tax credit of $1,029
    • Additional Child Tax Credit $ 75 (3000-2500= 500.  500 x15% -= $75).

The money you hear about people getting for just filing a tax return claiming kids requires them to  have some earned income (wages or self employment). Without earned income, they are not eligible for the "refundable" Earned Income Credit or Additional Child Tax Credit.  Both credits are calculated on the amount of earned income you have. No earned income means no "refund". A small amount of earned income means a small refund. The additional  child tax credit does not "kick in" unless you have at least $2500 of earned income.

 

A child can be the “qualifying child” dependent of any close relative in the household. If you live with someone else, e.g. your parents, it may be better if they claim your child.

Instead, you could allow the non-custodial parent to claim the children.  Non-custodial parents are allowed to claim the child tax credit (up to $2000), but not the Earned income credit.

 

 

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