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I share my my health insurance with my daughter whom I can't claim as dependent how I allocate the percentage

 
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Employee Tax Expert

I share my my health insurance with my daughter whom I can't claim as dependent how I allocate the percentage

You are allowed to allocate any way as long as the total from both returns equal 100%.  (Tip: You can input different amounts to see which is most beneficial- usually if the one with the lower income has the higher allocation (even up to 100%) you may save money on your taxes)

You should see amounts on your 1095-A, column A, B, and C. You and your non-dependent should agree on what percentage of those amounts you’ll claim on your return, and what percentage she’ll claim on hers. You can use anything from zero to 100 percent, as long it all adds up to 100 percent.

Example: Nate is working and not on his parents' tax return. He is on their Marketplace health plan and listed on their 1095-A. He didn't receive a 1095-A in his name.

He and his parents have to figure out how much of column A (monthly enrollment premiums), column B (monthly SLCSP) and column C (advanced payments) on their 1095-A will go on their return and Nate's return. They decided that Nate will enter 10% of those amounts on his return and his parents will enter 90% on their return. They could have decided to have 100% on the parents' return and zero percentage on Nate's return.


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Employee Tax Expert

I share my my health insurance with my daughter whom I can't claim as dependent how I allocate the percentage

You are allowed to allocate any way as long as the total from both returns equal 100%.  (Tip: You can input different amounts to see which is most beneficial- usually if the one with the lower income has the higher allocation (even up to 100%) you may save money on your taxes)

You should see amounts on your 1095-A, column A, B, and C. You and your non-dependent should agree on what percentage of those amounts you’ll claim on your return, and what percentage she’ll claim on hers. You can use anything from zero to 100 percent, as long it all adds up to 100 percent.

Example: Nate is working and not on his parents' tax return. He is on their Marketplace health plan and listed on their 1095-A. He didn't receive a 1095-A in his name.

He and his parents have to figure out how much of column A (monthly enrollment premiums), column B (monthly SLCSP) and column C (advanced payments) on their 1095-A will go on their return and Nate's return. They decided that Nate will enter 10% of those amounts on his return and his parents will enter 90% on their return. They could have decided to have 100% on the parents' return and zero percentage on Nate's return.