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canrulzhoc
New Member

I filed our return (married jointly) and now I am wondering if my daughter needs to file her own. She is a student but she had a small income last year.

 
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PhilipK
New Member

I filed our return (married jointly) and now I am wondering if my daughter needs to file her own. She is a student but she had a small income last year.

She may not need to file.

https://ttlc.intuit.com/replies/5801438

If she had Taxes taken out of her income she can file a return to get that money refunded to her.

She may also qualify for the Freedom Edition which will allow her to Prepare Both her Federal and State Returns for Free.

https://ttlc.intuit.com/replies/3491786

I hope this helps



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2 Replies
PhilipK
New Member

I filed our return (married jointly) and now I am wondering if my daughter needs to file her own. She is a student but she had a small income last year.

She may not need to file.

https://ttlc.intuit.com/replies/5801438

If she had Taxes taken out of her income she can file a return to get that money refunded to her.

She may also qualify for the Freedom Edition which will allow her to Prepare Both her Federal and State Returns for Free.

https://ttlc.intuit.com/replies/3491786

I hope this helps



MorganQ
New Member

I filed our return (married jointly) and now I am wondering if my daughter needs to file her own. She is a student but she had a small income last year.

To claim an exemption for the child, you must be able to answer "yes" to all of the following questions.

Are they related to you?  The child can be your son, daughter, stepchild, eligible foster child, brother, sister, half brother, half sister, stepbrother, stepsister, adopted child or an offspring of any of them (as in grandchild).

Do they meet the age requirement? Your child must be under age 19 or, if a full-time student, under age 24. There is no age limit if your child is permanently and totally disabled.

Do they live with you? Your child must live with you for more than half the year, but several exceptions apply.

Do you financially support them? Your child may have a job, but that job cannot provide more than half of her support.

Are you the only person claiming them?  This requirement commonly applies to children of divorced parents. Here you must use the “tie breaker rules,” which are found in IRS Publication 501. These rules establish income, parentage and residency requirements for claiming a child.

The following apply to all dependents:

Are they a citizen or resident? The person must be a U.S. citizen, a U.S. national, a U.S. resident, or a resident of Canada or Mexico. Many people wonder if they can claim a foreign-exchange student who temporarily lives with them. The answer is maybe, but only if they meet this requirement.

Are you the only person claiming them as a dependent? You can’t claim someone who takes a personal exemption for himself or claims another dependent on his own tax form.

Are they filing a joint return? You cannot claim someone who is married and files a joint tax return. Say you support your married teenaged son: If he files a joint return with his spouse, you can’t claim him as a dependent.

If she qualifies as a dependent, go to the Personal Info part of the program. When on the Personal Info Summary, you can edit or add a dependent from there.

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