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michael22453
Returning Member

charitable deductions

I contributed an item that would cost 8,100.00 to replace. What would I be allowed to deduct
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4 Replies

charitable deductions

Did you have the item appraised?  What charitable organization was it donated to?  You need a written appraisal for donated items that you say are worth over $5000.

**Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to offer the most correct information possible. The poster disclaims any legal responsibility for the accuracy of the information that is contained in this post.**
michael22453
Returning Member

charitable deductions

the appraisal value was $6,688.00

charitable deductions

Here is how a similar question was answered by SuperUser Opus17:

 

 For a charity donation valued at more than $5000 for a single item or group of similar items, you need a signed appraisal by a qualified appraiser.  You also need a copy of form 8323 that is signed by the appraiser and by a financially responsible official from the charity that accepts the items.   You can still file your taxes electronically because TurboTax will prepare an electronic version of form 8323, but you will then also need to mail the signed original form to the IRS after you e-file.  

 

Actually, I realized this is only half the answer.

You also need to documents how and when you acquired the items, and the price you paid or their other cost basis.

Then, the deduction you can take for some or all of the items will sometimes be lower than the appraised value.  If you are donating items of property that have *increased* in value from what you paid for them, then the deduction value you can claim is 

a) the price you paid, if you are donating them for an unrelated purpose, or 
b) the fair market value, but only if you are donating them for a "related purpose."

Donating camera equipement to a photography museum, non-profit photography club, or college photography department would be a related purposes and you can claim the full value.  Donating them for an unrelated purposes, such as to be sold at auction to raise money when the charity's purpose is not related to photography, means that you can only claim the item's cost.

(In all cases, if the item's fair market value is lower than the price you paid, you can only claim the current value.  And it doesn't matter what the charity will do with the items.  The rule above only applies for items that have increased in value.)

For items that you did not buy yourself, your "cost" is the price paid by the previous owner if the item was gift, or the fair market value on the date of the previous owner's death, if it was inherited.
 
 
 
**Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to offer the most correct information possible. The poster disclaims any legal responsibility for the accuracy of the information that is contained in this post.**
michael22453
Returning Member

charitable deductions

thank you very much for your help
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