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zombie22--
New Member

Can I claim my daughter and her baby on my return? Babies medical medicare paid. Daughter concerned it violates Medicaid. She will get very little if she claims them.

Daughter and her little girl lived with me all of 2015 in Ohio.  She only made a few thousand dollars last year and due to that is getting almost no refund if she claims herself and her child.  I would like to claim her on my return & give her that money.  Her daughters medical expenses are covered by medicaid and she is concerned that would violate qualifying for the medicaid. 

1 Reply
PandoraS
New Member

Can I claim my daughter and her baby on my return? Babies medical medicare paid. Daughter concerned it violates Medicaid. She will get very little if she claims them.

You may be able to claim both your daughter and granddaughter providing that they meet the following qualifications:

The IRS rules for qualifying dependents cover just about every conceivable situation, from housekeepers to emancipated offspring.

Fortunately, most of us live simpler lives. The basic rules will cover almost everyone. Here’s how it all breaks down.

There are two types of dependents, each subject to different rules:

  • A qualifying child
  • A qualifying relative

For both types of dependents, you’ll need to answer the following questions to determine if you can claim them.

  • Are they a citizen or resident? The person must be a U.S. citizen, a U.S. national, a U.S. resident, or a resident of Canada or Mexico. Many people wonder if they can claim a foreign-exchange student who temporarily lives with them. The answer is maybe, but only if they meet this requirement.
  • Are you the only person claiming them as a dependent? You can’t claim someone who takes a personal exemption for himself or claims another dependent on his own tax form.
  • Are they filing a joint return? You cannot claim someone who is married and files a joint tax return. Say you support your married teenaged son: If he files a joint return with his spouse, you can’t claim him as a dependent.


In addition to the qualifications above, to claim an exemption for your child, you must be able to answer "yes" to all of the following questions.

  • Are they related to you? The child can be your son, daughter, stepchild, eligible foster child, brother, sister, half brother, half sister, stepbrother, stepsister, adopted child or an offspring of any of them.
  • Do they meet the age requirement? Your child must be under age 19 or, if a full-time student, under age 24. There is no age limit if your child is permanently and totally disabled.
  • Do they live with you? Your child must live with you for more than half the year, but several exceptions apply.
  • Do you financially support them? Your child may have a job, but that job cannot provide more than half of her support.
  • Are you the only person claiming them? This requirement commonly applies to children of divorced parents. Here you must use the “tie breaker rules,” which are found in IRS Publication 501. These rules establish income, parentage and residency requirements for claiming a child.

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