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sarandan
Returning Member

Hello, my daughter, who turned 21 in 2016, was a full-time student last year.

Her college and living expenses came from a combination of 1) earnings from a summer job, 2) a 529 account we contributed to over the years, and 3) a UGMA account in her name. Her 2016 earned and unearned income total well under withdrawals from the 529 and UGMA accounts. She can't be claimed by anyone else, and she's not married. Is there any reason we can't claim her as a dependent for last year?

1 Best answer

Accepted Solutions
JaimeG
New Member

Hello, my daughter, who turned 21 in 2016, was a full-time student last year.

Yes, by what you have mentioned she does not provide more than 50% of her support, she is a student under the age of 24, your daughter, and she isn't married so she remains your Qualified Child and can be placed as a dependent on your Tax Return. If she worked during the summer she may be able to receive a refund from her W2. When she files she must indicate that she is someone else's dependent.

Just for jollies; Below are the requirements set by the IRS for a Qualifying Child:

Five tests must be met for a child to be your qualifying child. The five tests are (each test below is a link to the details):

  1. Relationship
  2. Age
  3. Residency
  4. Support
  5. Joint return

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2 Replies
JaimeG
New Member

Hello, my daughter, who turned 21 in 2016, was a full-time student last year.

Yes, by what you have mentioned she does not provide more than 50% of her support, she is a student under the age of 24, your daughter, and she isn't married so she remains your Qualified Child and can be placed as a dependent on your Tax Return. If she worked during the summer she may be able to receive a refund from her W2. When she files she must indicate that she is someone else's dependent.

Just for jollies; Below are the requirements set by the IRS for a Qualifying Child:

Five tests must be met for a child to be your qualifying child. The five tests are (each test below is a link to the details):

  1. Relationship
  2. Age
  3. Residency
  4. Support
  5. Joint return
sarandan
Returning Member

Hello, my daughter, who turned 21 in 2016, was a full-time student last year.

Thanks JaimeG!
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