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sagebirder
New Member

Husband &I moved (ID to WA) at start of Aug2016. Just completed TurboTax Deluxe w/ID download. ID didn't tax any of husband's income (nearly $140K) & we don't understand!

Husband worked in NV all of 2016. Same in 2013-2015; during those years ID taxed us heavily. We expected to pay ID taxes for 7/12 of 2016. Does ID just not tax out-of-state wages for part-yr residents? Or is this an error in ID forms for 2016 and we need to adjust?
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DanielV01
Expert Alumni

Husband &I moved (ID to WA) at start of Aug2016. Just completed TurboTax Deluxe w/ID download. ID didn't tax any of husband's income (nearly $140K) & we don't understand!

It depends.  Idaho taxes the income that you earn from all sources while living in Idaho, which includes the Nevada income you mention.  The question here is how the programming is picking up the income.  If on your husband's W-2, box 15 says "NV", and you're (correctly) filing a part-year return in Idaho, the program cannot automatically determine that the Nevada income belongs to the time you are an Idaho resident.  For this, you will need to allocate  (or designate) this income and claim it for Idaho.  Once you do, you will see the tax appear in the program.  Here is an FAQ on allocation:  https://ttlc.intuit.com/replies/4777389

Any amount, however, that your husband earned once you moved to Washington is not taxable to any state.  Neither Nevada nor Washington have state income tax, and Idaho cannot tax income neither earned in Idaho nor after you ceased being residents of Idaho.

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2 Replies
DanielV01
Expert Alumni

Husband &I moved (ID to WA) at start of Aug2016. Just completed TurboTax Deluxe w/ID download. ID didn't tax any of husband's income (nearly $140K) & we don't understand!

It depends.  Idaho taxes the income that you earn from all sources while living in Idaho, which includes the Nevada income you mention.  The question here is how the programming is picking up the income.  If on your husband's W-2, box 15 says "NV", and you're (correctly) filing a part-year return in Idaho, the program cannot automatically determine that the Nevada income belongs to the time you are an Idaho resident.  For this, you will need to allocate  (or designate) this income and claim it for Idaho.  Once you do, you will see the tax appear in the program.  Here is an FAQ on allocation:  https://ttlc.intuit.com/replies/4777389

Any amount, however, that your husband earned once you moved to Washington is not taxable to any state.  Neither Nevada nor Washington have state income tax, and Idaho cannot tax income neither earned in Idaho nor after you ceased being residents of Idaho.

**Say "Thanks" by clicking the thumb icon in a post
**Mark the post that answers your question by clicking on "Mark as Best Answer"
TerryA
Level 7

Husband &I moved (ID to WA) at start of Aug2016. Just completed TurboTax Deluxe w/ID download. ID didn't tax any of husband's income (nearly $140K) & we don't understand!

Unfortunately, since the NV employer didn't put ID in the W-2 Box 15, TT/Idaho is leaving the Form 43 line 7 Wages line blank and TT/Idaho doesn't visit that field for you to enter the portion of wages earned while Idaho residents.

To fix that you'll have to enter ID in the W-2 Box 15 and the Idaho portion of the total wages (Jan-Jul) in Box 16 to get the return to come out right.

That might violate some e-filing rule and if it does then print out the Idaho return and file by mail.

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