turbotax icon
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
turbotax icon
turbotax icon
turbotax icon
turbotax icon
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Close icon
Do you have a TurboTax Online account?

We'll help you get started or pick up where you left off.

We married July 18. different HDHP plans. I'm self only, hers family self/kids. It's saying she contributed over limit, she did not. how do i enter this w/o that option?

Turbo Tax software only has self only or family plan. I was self & cont $3875, She was family self and children & cont $5575. We are on different plans and married in July. Turbo is saying she contributed over the limit but she did not. How do I enter this in Turbo Tax without that option?
Connect with an expert
x
Do you have an Intuit account?

Do you have an Intuit account?

You'll need to sign in or create an account to connect with an expert.

1 Best answer

Accepted Solutions

We married July 18. different HDHP plans. I'm self only, hers family self/kids. It's saying she contributed over limit, she did not. how do i enter this w/o that option?

It is very unfortunate that employers do not provide training or someone to call for the determining of your annual HSA contribution limit. The rules - especially for married couples who may or may not each have an HSA are somewhat complex and are not easily understood by reading the IRS documentation.

If you are married and one spouse has Family HDHP coverage, then the IRS requires that you both report Family HDHP coverage. At the same time, the two spouses must share the annual HSA contribution limit of $6,900 (if both are under 55). That is, according to the example given by the IRS in the instructions for form 8889 (see line 6 at https://www.irs.gov/instructions/i8889#idm140493806467968), even if you two had separate HDHP coverage for part of the year and two HSAs, if you were both listing Family coverage at the end of the year, your limit is $6,900.

That is, you don't contribute to your Self policy and your spouse contribute to her Family policy, because you were both Family for the year, you must share on an annual basis the $6,900 limit for the year.

So you contributed $3,875 and she contributed $5,575 for a total of $9,450, which is $2,550 over the limit. If one of you had been 55 or over by the end of the year, then the total limit would be $7,900. If both of you are 55 or over, then the total limit is $8,900, but you must put at least $1,000 in each HSA.

In any case, no matter what your ages are, you are over the limit.

P.S. The IRS example is:
"In 2018, you are an eligible individual and have self-only HDHP coverage. In March you marry and as of April 1 you have family HDHP coverage. Neither you nor your spouse qualify for the additional contribution amount. Your spouse has a separate HSA and is an eligible individual from April 1 to December 31, 2018. Because you and your spouse are considered to have family coverage on December 1, your contribution limit is $6,900 (the family coverage maximum). You and your spouse can divide this amount in any allocation to which you agree (such as allocating nothing to one spouse)." (Line 6 at the link above)

View solution in original post

1 Reply

We married July 18. different HDHP plans. I'm self only, hers family self/kids. It's saying she contributed over limit, she did not. how do i enter this w/o that option?

It is very unfortunate that employers do not provide training or someone to call for the determining of your annual HSA contribution limit. The rules - especially for married couples who may or may not each have an HSA are somewhat complex and are not easily understood by reading the IRS documentation.

If you are married and one spouse has Family HDHP coverage, then the IRS requires that you both report Family HDHP coverage. At the same time, the two spouses must share the annual HSA contribution limit of $6,900 (if both are under 55). That is, according to the example given by the IRS in the instructions for form 8889 (see line 6 at https://www.irs.gov/instructions/i8889#idm140493806467968), even if you two had separate HDHP coverage for part of the year and two HSAs, if you were both listing Family coverage at the end of the year, your limit is $6,900.

That is, you don't contribute to your Self policy and your spouse contribute to her Family policy, because you were both Family for the year, you must share on an annual basis the $6,900 limit for the year.

So you contributed $3,875 and she contributed $5,575 for a total of $9,450, which is $2,550 over the limit. If one of you had been 55 or over by the end of the year, then the total limit would be $7,900. If both of you are 55 or over, then the total limit is $8,900, but you must put at least $1,000 in each HSA.

In any case, no matter what your ages are, you are over the limit.

P.S. The IRS example is:
"In 2018, you are an eligible individual and have self-only HDHP coverage. In March you marry and as of April 1 you have family HDHP coverage. Neither you nor your spouse qualify for the additional contribution amount. Your spouse has a separate HSA and is an eligible individual from April 1 to December 31, 2018. Because you and your spouse are considered to have family coverage on December 1, your contribution limit is $6,900 (the family coverage maximum). You and your spouse can divide this amount in any allocation to which you agree (such as allocating nothing to one spouse)." (Line 6 at the link above)
Use your Intuit Account to sign in to TurboTax.
By selecting Sign in, you agree to our Terms and acknowledge our Privacy Statement.
message box icon

Get more help

Ask questions and learn more about your taxes and finances.

Post your Question

Related Content

Manage cookies