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jimknaz
New Member

My ex-wife became ill in July 2015, passed away in February 2016. I have receipts for $7700.00 direct expenses caring for her. Is any of that deductible

She moved back into my house in July 2015, died in Feb 2016.  I filed 2015 taxes for her. She had only 2700 income in 2016. Is any of the 7700.00 dollars deductible?
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IreneS
Intuit Alumni

My ex-wife became ill in July 2015, passed away in February 2016. I have receipts for $7700.00 direct expenses caring for her. Is any of that deductible

UPDATED FOR TAX YEAR 2019

 

I'm sorry for your loss!

 

Yes.  Claim the medical expenses on your return.

Since your ex-wife's income was below the filing requirement, you do not have to file a tax return for her, unless there is withholding to get back.  If you do file a return for her, mark the boxes that someone else is claiming her as a dependent.


Since she was your ex-wife and a member of your household, you may qualify for the Credit for Other Dependents.  It is a $500 tax break for people with dependents who are 17 or older, and may or may not be related to them.  In order to qualify for the Credit for Other Dependents, a dependent needs to meet each of these requirements:

 

  1. Member of Household or Relationship: This person lives in your home for the entire year and is considered to be a member of your household or is related to you. If this person is your child, they must be age 17 or older at the end of 2018 unless they use an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN). In this case, they can be any age.
  2. Gross income: Generally, their income is less than $4,200 (not including Social Security or welfare).
  3. Support: Generally, you provide more than half the person's support. Special rules apply for children of divorced or separated parents or children receiving support from two or more people.
  4.  Marital status: Generally, a married dependent can't file a joint tax return with a spouse. The only exception is when the married dependent files a joint return only to get a refund for taxes paid. If both spouses filed separate returns, neither the dependent nor spouse would have a tax liability.
  5. Nationality: This person is a U.S. citizen, U.S. resident alien, U.S. national, or a resident of Canada or Mexico. They have either a Social Security number or an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN). An adopted child who doesn't meet this requirement but lives with you for the entire year can be your dependent, as long as you're a U.S. citizen.

[Edited | 3/31/2020 |  9:05am PDT]

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1 Reply
IreneS
Intuit Alumni

My ex-wife became ill in July 2015, passed away in February 2016. I have receipts for $7700.00 direct expenses caring for her. Is any of that deductible

UPDATED FOR TAX YEAR 2019

 

I'm sorry for your loss!

 

Yes.  Claim the medical expenses on your return.

Since your ex-wife's income was below the filing requirement, you do not have to file a tax return for her, unless there is withholding to get back.  If you do file a return for her, mark the boxes that someone else is claiming her as a dependent.


Since she was your ex-wife and a member of your household, you may qualify for the Credit for Other Dependents.  It is a $500 tax break for people with dependents who are 17 or older, and may or may not be related to them.  In order to qualify for the Credit for Other Dependents, a dependent needs to meet each of these requirements:

 

  1. Member of Household or Relationship: This person lives in your home for the entire year and is considered to be a member of your household or is related to you. If this person is your child, they must be age 17 or older at the end of 2018 unless they use an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN). In this case, they can be any age.
  2. Gross income: Generally, their income is less than $4,200 (not including Social Security or welfare).
  3. Support: Generally, you provide more than half the person's support. Special rules apply for children of divorced or separated parents or children receiving support from two or more people.
  4.  Marital status: Generally, a married dependent can't file a joint tax return with a spouse. The only exception is when the married dependent files a joint return only to get a refund for taxes paid. If both spouses filed separate returns, neither the dependent nor spouse would have a tax liability.
  5. Nationality: This person is a U.S. citizen, U.S. resident alien, U.S. national, or a resident of Canada or Mexico. They have either a Social Security number or an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN). An adopted child who doesn't meet this requirement but lives with you for the entire year can be your dependent, as long as you're a U.S. citizen.

[Edited | 3/31/2020 |  9:05am PDT]

**Say "Thanks" by clicking the thumb icon in a post
**Mark the post that answers your question by clicking on "Mark as Best Answer"
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