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burrissb
New Member

Is there a reason why my state is missing from the W2 form 'State taxes (Boxes 15-17)'?

 
3 Replies
BillM223
Employee Tax Expert

Is there a reason why my state is missing from the W2 form 'State taxes (Boxes 15-17)'?

Which state? And what is in boxes 15-17? Are you in Washington State and is this Paid Family Leave tax?

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nebirah
Level 3

Is there a reason why my state is missing from the W2 form 'State taxes (Boxes 15-17)'?

The state code is not a requirement.

 

The software should allow you to submit the W2 information without the code. If it doesn't, then choose from the dropdown the correct state where you worked. The system will figure it out.

DawnC
Employee Tax Expert

Is there a reason why my state is missing from the W2 form 'State taxes (Boxes 15-17)'?

AlaskaFloridaNevadaSouth DakotaTexasWashington, and Wyoming don't have income tax. If you're a resident of one of these states, you don't need to file a return in that state.

In addition, New Hampshire and Tennessee only tax interest and dividend income, not wages, earnings, or other income:

  • New Hampshire residents only file a tax return if their interest and dividend income exceeded $2,400 ($4,800 for joint filers) plus additional exemptions for age, blindness, and disability.
  • Tennessee residents only file a tax return if their interest and dividend income exceeded $1,250 ($2,500 for joint filers). This is the Hall income tax.

If you're a resident in one of the remaining "taxable" states and you earned money working in one of these "tax-free" states, that income needs to be reported on your resident state return.

For example, if you're a California resident and worked in tax-free Texas, you'd still have to report your Texas earnings on your California return as well as your federal return.

 

Similarly, if you're a resident of tax-free Texas and earned money in California, you'd still have to file a nonresident California return to report your earnings, and you'd report those on your federal return as well.

 

If there are no amounts withheld for state taxes, leave those fields blank, including the state abbreviation box.  

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