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medoomi
New Member

Can I amotize a change to the assessed value of real estate rental property?

I have amortized the value of the rental property the last two years (27.5 year life). However, the property was recently re-assessed at a higher value. How would I increase the value of the amortization?
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Accepted Solutions
Coleen3
Intuit Alumni

Can I amotize a change to the assessed value of real estate rental property?

Unfortunately, you can't. The basis for depreciation is the lower of Adjusted Basis or Fair Market Value on the date of availability. The only way you can increase basis is by making improvements, that is, putting more money into the property.

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3 Replies
Coleen3
Intuit Alumni

Can I amotize a change to the assessed value of real estate rental property?

Unfortunately, you can't. The basis for depreciation is the lower of Adjusted Basis or Fair Market Value on the date of availability. The only way you can increase basis is by making improvements, that is, putting more money into the property.

LandonC
New Member

Can I amotize a change to the assessed value of real estate rental property?

Hi. I'm wondering something similar. 
Can I check what I originally input (last year) as my land value and assessed value on a rental property ?
I think I did it wrong. 

Carl
Level 15

Can I amotize a change to the assessed value of real estate rental property?

Just work through the asset in the assets/depreciation section on your 2021 return. When you click the EDIT button next to an asset, the very first screen will show you the "cost" and "cost of land" originally entered in the year you acquired the property, or the year you converted the property to rental; whichever occurred last.

Under no circumstances and with no exceptions should you ever change the cost basis of an asset. Doing so will completely skew the depreciation history, and the current year's depreciation taken will be wrong. There are no exceptions.

While it may not happen quickly, changing the cost basis of an asset "will" raise flags, and you'll get a nastygram from the IRS generally 24-36 months after the filed return is accepted and processed.

 

 

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