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mhornsby0788
New Member

My son goes to college and files his own taxes although I still claim him on ours. Do I have to include all the scholarship and supplies info? He has to do the same thing on his.

 
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MargaretL
Employee Tax Expert

My son goes to college and files his own taxes although I still claim him on ours. Do I have to include all the scholarship and supplies info? He has to do the same thing on his.

You claim all of your son's scholarship, tuition, other qualified education expenses and form 1098-T since he is claimed as your dependent on your tax return.  Your son doesn't claim anything. He is not allowed any education benefits as a dependent.

However, if the scholarship exceeds his expenses, the excess is considered taxable income to your son. In this case, your would claim scholarship/education expenses/form 1098-T to report that taxable income. The good news is: if excess scholarship is his only income and it is less than $6300 for the year, your son is not required to file at all.  

If student's earned income (such as W-2), when added to scholarship exceeds $6300, then he is required to file his own tax return. When he files -  be sure that he indicates on his tax return he is being claimed by someone else. 

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MargaretL
Employee Tax Expert

My son goes to college and files his own taxes although I still claim him on ours. Do I have to include all the scholarship and supplies info? He has to do the same thing on his.

You claim all of your son's scholarship, tuition, other qualified education expenses and form 1098-T since he is claimed as your dependent on your tax return.  Your son doesn't claim anything. He is not allowed any education benefits as a dependent.

However, if the scholarship exceeds his expenses, the excess is considered taxable income to your son. In this case, your would claim scholarship/education expenses/form 1098-T to report that taxable income. The good news is: if excess scholarship is his only income and it is less than $6300 for the year, your son is not required to file at all.  

If student's earned income (such as W-2), when added to scholarship exceeds $6300, then he is required to file his own tax return. When he files -  be sure that he indicates on his tax return he is being claimed by someone else. 

View solution in original post

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