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laveraw80
New Member

Can I carry my son as a dependent on my tax return?

My son gets SSI because of his disability and he does not work. For 2018, he received $14,700.00 in SSI benefits for his only income. He is 35 and lives with me. Can I carry him as a dependent on my 2018 income tax return?

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1 Best answer

Accepted Solutions
KatrinaB
Intuit Alumni

Can I carry my son as a dependent on my tax return?

It sounds like you qualify to claim him based on his income. However, the eligibility requirements are different depending on if he is permanently disabled or not. He must qualify as your dependent under one of the sets of rules below.


Qualifying Child Rules: These rules apply if he is permanently disabled.
  • Are they related to you? The child can be your son, daughter, stepchild, eligible foster child, brother, sister, half brother, half sister, stepbrother, stepsister, adopted child or an offspring of any of them.
  • Do they meet the age requirement? Your child must be under age 19 or, if a full-time student, under age 24. There is no age limit if your child is permanently and totally disabled.
  • Do they live with you? Your child must live with you for more than half the year, but several exceptions apply.
  • Do you financially support them? Your child may have a job, but that job cannot provide more than half of her support.
  • Are you the only person claiming them? This requirement commonly applies to children of divorced parents. Here you must use the “tie breaker rules,” which are found in IRS Publication 501. These rules establish income, parentage and residency requirements for claiming a child.


Qualifying Relative Rules: These rules apply if he is not permanently disabled.
  • Do they live with you? Your relative must live at your residence all year or be on the list of “relatives who do not live with you” in Publication 501. About 30 types of relatives are on this list.
  • Do they make less than $4,150 in 2018? Your relative cannot have a gross income of more than $4,150 in 2018 and be claimed by you as a dependent.
  • Do you financially support them? You must provide more than half of your relative’s total support each year.
  • Are you the only person claiming them? This means you can’t claim the same person twice, once as a qualifying relative and again as a qualifying child. It also means you can’t claim a relative—say a cousin—if someone else, such as his parents, also claim him.



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1 Reply
KatrinaB
Intuit Alumni

Can I carry my son as a dependent on my tax return?

It sounds like you qualify to claim him based on his income. However, the eligibility requirements are different depending on if he is permanently disabled or not. He must qualify as your dependent under one of the sets of rules below.


Qualifying Child Rules: These rules apply if he is permanently disabled.
  • Are they related to you? The child can be your son, daughter, stepchild, eligible foster child, brother, sister, half brother, half sister, stepbrother, stepsister, adopted child or an offspring of any of them.
  • Do they meet the age requirement? Your child must be under age 19 or, if a full-time student, under age 24. There is no age limit if your child is permanently and totally disabled.
  • Do they live with you? Your child must live with you for more than half the year, but several exceptions apply.
  • Do you financially support them? Your child may have a job, but that job cannot provide more than half of her support.
  • Are you the only person claiming them? This requirement commonly applies to children of divorced parents. Here you must use the “tie breaker rules,” which are found in IRS Publication 501. These rules establish income, parentage and residency requirements for claiming a child.


Qualifying Relative Rules: These rules apply if he is not permanently disabled.
  • Do they live with you? Your relative must live at your residence all year or be on the list of “relatives who do not live with you” in Publication 501. About 30 types of relatives are on this list.
  • Do they make less than $4,150 in 2018? Your relative cannot have a gross income of more than $4,150 in 2018 and be claimed by you as a dependent.
  • Do you financially support them? You must provide more than half of your relative’s total support each year.
  • Are you the only person claiming them? This means you can’t claim the same person twice, once as a qualifying relative and again as a qualifying child. It also means you can’t claim a relative—say a cousin—if someone else, such as his parents, also claim him.



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