Am I eligible for a state renter's tax credit?

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Am I eligible for a state renter's tax credit?

If you pay rent on your primary residence, you might be able to claim a tax credit. These are awarded only on the state level—there there is no federal renter’s tax credit.

If your state offers such a credit, we'll ask rent-related questions when you go through your interview in TurboTax. But if you want more info, find your state below to learn what tax credits you may qualify for.

Note: Most of these credits depend on the owner of your building paying property taxes. If they don’t, you may not qualify.

Alabama (AL) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Alaska (AK) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Arizona (AZ) offers a credit to renters who fulfill all of these requirements:

  • Lived in Arizona the entire year
  • Paid rent on a main home in Arizona during the tax year
  • Were 65 or older by December 31 of the tax year or received Title 16 Supplemental Security Income
  • Earned a total household income less than $5,501 or less than $3,751 if they lived alone

You can claim this credit when you file your state tax return.

Arkansas (AR) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

California (CA) offers a credit to renters who fulfill all of these requirements:

  • Paid rent in California for at least half the year
  • Made $43,533 or less (single or married/registered domestic partner (RDP) filing separately) or $87,066 or less (married/RDP filing jointly, head of household, or qualified widow(er))
  • Didn’t live with someone who can claim you as a dependent
  • Weren’t given a property tax exemption during the tax year

You’ll get $60 if you’re single or married/RDP filing separately or $120 if you’re married/RDP filing jointly, head of household, or qualified widow(er). You can claim this credit when you file your state tax return.

Colorado (CO) offers a rebate to renters who fulfill all of these requirements:

  • Lived in Colorado the entire year
  • Are 65 years of age or older, a surviving spouse 58 years of age or older, or disabled
  • Aren’t claimed as a dependent on another person's federal income tax return

You need to apply here to receive this rebate.

Connecticut (CT) offers a rebate to renters who fulfill all of these requirements:

  • Lived in Connecticut for at least one year
  • Are 65 years of age or older, a surviving spouse of someone who was entitled to renters tax relief 50 years of age or older, or disabled

You can get up to $900 if you’re married or $700 if you’re single. You need to apply with this form to receive this rebate.

Delaware (DE) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

District of Columbia (DC) offers a credit to renters depending on household income. You can claim this credit by filing a Schedule H form when you file your state tax return.

Florida (FL) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Georgia (GA) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Hawaii (HI) offers a credit to renters who fulfill all of these requirements:

  • Made less than $30,000
  • Paid more than $1,000 in rent
  • Aren’t claimed as a dependent by someone else

You can claim this credit when you file your state tax return.

Idaho (ID) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Illinois (IL) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Indiana (IN) offers a deduction to all renters, up to $3,000. You can claim this deduction when you file your state tax return.

Iowa (IA) offers a credit to renters who fulfill all of these requirements:

  • Had a household income less than $24,206 
  • Are 65 years of age or older or at least 18 years old and have a disability

You have to apply for this relief every year using this form.

Kansas (KS) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Kentucky (KY) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Louisiana (LA) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Maine (ME) offers a credit to renters who fulfill all of these requirements:

  • Paid rent on your primary residence in Maine during any part of the tax year
  • Are not married filing separately
  • Made less than $42,000 if single, $54,000 if head of household, or $67,000 if married filed jointly

You can claim this credit when you file your state tax return.

Maryland (MD) offers a credit to renters who are age 60 or older, disabled, or make below a certain income. You can get up to $1,000. You have to apply for this relief every year using this form.

Massachusetts (MA) offers a credit to renters for up to 50% of your rent paid, up to $3,000, as long as the rental property is your primary residence. You can claim this credit when you file your state tax return.

Michigan (MI) offers a credit to renters who fulfill all of these requirements:

  • Paid rent on your primary residence in Michigan for at least 6 months
  • Made $60,000 or less in household income

You can claim this credit when you file your state tax return with form MI-1040CR.

Minnesota (MN) offers a tax refund to renters who fulfill all of these requirements:

  • Spent more than 183 days in the state
  • Aren’t claimed as a dependent by someone else
  • Made less than $62,960

You have to apply using Form M1PR.

Mississippi (MS) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Missouri (MO) offers a rebate to renters who fulfill all of these requirements:

  • Made $27,00 or less if single or $29,200 or less if married filing jointly
  • Are 65 years of age or older, a surviving spouse 60 years of age or older, or disabled

You can get up to $750. You need to apply here to receive this rebate.

Montana (MT) offers a credit to renters who fulfill all of these requirements:

  • Were 62 years of age or older on December 31
  • Lived in Montana for at least nine months
  • Rented a home in Montana for at least six months
  • Have a household income under $45,000

You can get up to $1,000. You can claim this credit when you file your state tax return.

Nebraska (NE) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Nevada (NV) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

New Hampshire (NH) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

New Jersey (NJ) offers two tax breaks for renters, letting you take advantage of whichever gives you the most money:

  • A property tax deduction of 18% of your rent
  • A property tax credit of $50

You can claim either the deduction or the credit when you file your state tax return.

New Mexico (NM) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

New York (NY) offers a credit to renters who fulfill all of these requirements:

  • Have a household gross income of $18,000 or less
  • Lived in the same New York residence for at least six months
  • Were a New York State resident for the entire tax year
  • Paid $450 or less in monthly rent, not counting charges for heat, gas, electricity, furnishings, or board
  • Owned property, such as houses, garages, and land, totaling to a value of $85,000 or less
  • Aren’t claimed as a dependent by someone else

You can get up to $375, depending on your age. You can claim this credit when you file your state tax return with Form IT-214.

North Carolina (NC) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

North Dakota (ND) offers a refund to renters who are 65 years of age or older or disabled. If 20% of your annual rent exceeds 4% of your income, you’ll receive a refund for overpayment of rent in the amount of the difference, up to $400.

You need to apply here to receive this refund.

Ohio (OH) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Oklahoma (OK) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Oregon (OR) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Pennsylvania (PA) offers a rebate to renters who fulfill all of these requirements:

  • Made $15,000 or less
  • Are 65 years of age or older, a widow(er) 50 years of age or older, or disabled

You can get up to $650 depending on your income. You must apply here to receive this credit.

Rhode Island (RI) offers a credit to renters who fulfill all of these requirements:

  • Are 65 years of age or older or disabled
  • Lived in Rhode Island for the entire calendar year
  • Had a household income of $30,000 or less
  • Are current on all rent payments

You can claim this credit when you file your state tax return with form RI-1040H.

South Carolina (SC) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

South Dakota (SD) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Tennessee (TN) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Texas (TX) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Utah (UT) offers a refund to renters who fulfill all of these requirements:

  • Were 66 years of age or older on December 31 or are a widow(er) of any age
  • Lived in Utah for the entire calendar year 
  • Aren’t claimed as a dependent by someone else
  • Meet certain income requirements

You have to apply here to receive this refund.

Vermont (VT) offers a rebate to renters who fulfill all of these requirements:

  • Lived in Vermont for the entire year
  • Made $47,000 or less
  • Aren’t claimed as a dependent by someone else

Only one person per household can take advantage of this rebate. You can claim it when you file your state tax return.

Virginia (VA) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Washington (WA) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

West Virginia (WV) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

Wisconsin (WI) offers a credit to renters who fulfill all of these requirements:

  • Lived in Wisconsin from January 1 through December 31
  • Are 18 years of age or older on December 31
  • Have less than $24,680 in household income
  • Have positive earned income, are 62 years of age or older, or are disabled
  • Aren’t claimed as a dependent by someone else
  • Aren’t receiving Title XIX medical assistance
  • Aren’t claiming Wisconsin farmland preservation credit
  • Aren’t claiming the veterans and surviving spouses property tax credit
  • Haven’t received Wisconsin Works (W2) payments of any amount or county relief payments of $400 or more each month

Only one person per household can take advantage of this rebate. You can claim it when you file your state tax return with Schedule H-EZ.

Wyoming (WY) doesn’t offer a renter's credit.

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