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**Tax Year 2018 or earlier** Part of my alimony paid is cellphone, auto insurance, health and dental insurance ordered to pay on her behalf... Deductible?

 
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**Tax Year 2018 or earlier** Part of my alimony paid is cellphone, auto insurance, health and dental insurance ordered to pay on her behalf... Deductible?

The IRS defines alimony as follows:

Amounts paid under divorce or separate maintenance decrees or written separation agreements entered into between you and your spouse or former spouse are considered alimony for federal tax purposes if:

  • You and your spouse or former spouse do not file a joint return with each other

  • You pay in cash (including checks or money orders)

  • The payment is received by (or on behalf of) your spouse or former spouse

  • The divorce or separate maintenance decree or written separation agreement does not say the payment is not alimony

  • If legally separated under a decree of divorce or separate maintenance, you and your former spouse are not members of the same household when you make the payment

  • You have no liability to make the payment (in cash or property) after the death of your spouse or former spouse, and

  • Your payment is not treated as child support or a property settlement

     

    Payments Not Alimony

    Not all payments under a divorce or separation instrument are alimony. Alimony does not include:

  • Child support

  • Noncash property settlements

  • Payments that are your spouse's part of community property income

  • Payments to keep up the payer's property, or

  • Use of the payer's property

    https://www.irs.gov/taxtopics/tc452.html

If the above items are paid for in cash (or cash equivalents), per the divorce decree, you should regard them as alimony.

 


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