TurboTax FAQ
TurboTax FAQ
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I divorced before 2016, how do I handle a 1095-A?

If you divorced prior to 2016, have health insurance through the Marketplace and everyone listed on your 1095-A are also on your tax return, you just enter your 1095-A information in TurboTax and we'll handle the rest.

If you divorced before 2016, your children are listed on your ex-spouse’s tax return and are also on your ex-spouse's 1095-A, unless you have a 1095-A of your own, you don’t need to enter any 1095-A information.

If you divorced in 2016, see I divorced in 2016; how do I handle a 1095-A?

Your children are dependents on your tax return, but they are listed on your ex-spouse’s 1095-A, and that 1095-A has amounts in columns A, B and C

In this case, TurboTax will ask you to enter the information from your ex-spouse’s 1095-A. The next screen will ask  you about your health plan being shared, so check the box.

Then you'll see a screen asking for shared policy information. You enter the following:

  • Enter the social security number in box 5 (recipient's SSN) on your ex-spouse’s 1095-A
  • Enter the start month and stop month that your children had that insurance

Now you'll be asked to enter percentages for Your Premium, SLCSP and advanced payment.

You and your ex-spouse can agree on what percentage of those amounts in column A, B, and C that each of you will claim on your returns. You can use anything from zero to 100 percent, as long it all adds up to 100 percent. You can have one return show zero percent and the other return show 100% of the 1095-A amounts. You will use the same percentage in all three boxes.

If you can’t agree, take the number of your children on your tax return that are also on your ex-spouse's health plan. You take that number and divide it by the total number of people enrolled on the ex-spouse’s health plan. That’s the percentage you’ll enter in TurboTax.

Here’s an example:

Joe and Alice have been divorced since 2013 and have two children, Chris and Jane. Joe enrolls himself, Chris, and Jane in a qualified Marketplace health plan for 2016. Joe receives a 1095-A and it has amounts in columns A, B, and C.

Jane lives with Alice for more than half of 2016 so Alice claims Jane as a dependent. Joe claims Chris as a dependent on his return.

Since they can’t agree on a percentage, Alice figures out her percentage by dividing 1 (Jane is on her return) by 3  (the number of people on Joe's 1095-A). So she enters 33% in TurboTax.

Your children are dependents on your tax return, but they are listed on your ex-spouse’s 1095-A; that 1095-A has amounts in column A and B but not in C

Since your ex-spouse’s 1095-A has no amounts in column C but does have amounts in columns A and B, follow these guidelines.

TurboTax will ask you to enter a 1095-A. You'll enter the information from your ex-spouse’s 1095-A.

The next screen will ask you about this health plan being shared, so check the box.

Then you'll see a screen asking for shared policy information. You should:

  • Enter the social security number (recipient's SSN) you find in box 5 on your ex-spouse’s 1095-A
  • Enter the starting month and ending month that your children had that insurance

Now you'll be asked to enter percentages. You’ll need to figure out the share of the amounts on the 1095-A for your children on your tax return and also on your ex-spouse’s 1095-A.

Go to the tax tool page on HealthCare.gov and click on GET STARTED under Figure out your premium tax credit. For each child on your return and also on your ex-spouse's 1095-A, enter their birthdate, zip code, and number of months that the child was covered by the ex-spouse's insurance. You’ll see their monthly SLCSP results.

Add up the monthly  SLCSP results. Then you'll divide the SLCSP results by the total of column B (SLCSP) on your ex-spouse’s 1095-A. That's the percentage you'll enter in TurboTax.

Example: Joe and Alice have been divorced since 2012 and have two children, Chris and Jane. Joe has a Marketplace health plan that covers himself and both children. Joe receives a 1095-A that has amounts in columns A and B but not in C. The total for column B is $18,000.

Jane lives with Alice for more than half of 2016 and Alice claims Jane as a dependent. Joe claims Chris on his return. Alice needs to figure out Jane’s share of an ex-spouse's 1095-A amounts.

Alice goes to the tax tool page on HealthCare.gov and enters Jane’s age, zip code and 12 months that she was enrolled.  Alice totals the monthly SLCSP results for Jane and it's $6,000. Alice then takes the $6,000 and divides it by the $18,000 (total of column B). It equals 33% - Jane’s percentage. Alice enters it in all three boxes.

Your children are dependents on your tax return, but they are listed on your ex-spouse’s 1095-A; that 1095-A has amounts in column A but not in B and C

Since your ex-spouse’s 1095-A has amounts in column A but not in B and C, follow these guidelines.

TurboTax will ask you to enter a 1095-A. You'll enter the information from your ex-spouse’s 1095-A.

TurboTax needs the amounts in column B to figure out if you are eligible for a Premium Tax Credit on your return. You need to use the tax tool on HealthCare.gov to determine the monthly SLCSP amounts for everyone listed on their 1095-A. You enter the birthdate, zip code, and number of months covered by the health plan for each person on the ex-spouse’s 1095-A.

Enter each monthly results in column B for the 1095-A.

The next screen will ask you about your health plan being shared, check the box.

Then you'll see a screen asking for shared policy information. You should:

  • Enter the social security number (recipient's SSN) you find in box 5 on your ex-spouse’s 1095-A
  • Enter the starting month and ending month that your child had the insurance

Now you'll be asked to enter percentages for just the children on your tax return. You’ll go back to the tax tool on HealthCare.gov and enter the birthdate, zip code, and number of months for each of the children on your return and also on the 1095-A. Add up the monthly results for all children. That’s your children’s SLCSP result.

Then you’ll divide your children’s SLCSP by the total SLCSP amount for all people listed on the plan. That’s the percentage you will enter in TurboTax.

Example: Joe and Alice have been divorced since 2012 and have two children, Chris and Jane. Joe has a Marketplace health plan that covers himself and both children. Joe receives a 1095-A that has amounts in column A but not in columns B or C.

Jane lives with Alice for more than half of 2016 and Alice claims Jane as a dependent. Joe claims Chris on his return. Alice needs to figure out Jane’s share of her parent’s 1095-A amounts.

Alice goes to the tax tool on HealthCare.gov and enters the age, zip code and months of enrollment for Joe, Chris and Jane.  She enters those monthly results in column B of the 1095-A on the TurboTax screen. The total of the amounts in Column B equals $18,000.

Alice goes back to the tax tool on HealthCare.gov and enters the age, zip code and months of enrollment for only Jane. That result is $6,000. Alice takes the $6,000 and divides it by the $18,000. It equals 33% - Jane’s percentage. Alice enters that amount in all three boxes.


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