Too late to file 2012 tax return?

I just realized that it's past October 15th -- shoot! What are my options? Can I still file a 2012 tax return using TurboTax online? If not, how should I do it? And what are the ramifications of being late?

Thank you!
  • where can i file late taxes
  • You have to file by mail.
  • Where does one get the forms to do it, and what if you don't have the w-2 anymore?
  • You can pull the blank forms from the IRS and state tax websites. Ask your employer for the W-2.
  • I did request my w-2's but never received them, which is why I had to file late. I did contact the IRS for the information, which I received yesterday. Can I just send a copy of the record they sent me in the w-2's place?
  • You mean send them back to the IRS?
  • how do you prove you did not file a 2012 income tax ?
  • milfam: What did you with the w2's?
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First of all, if you are due a refund, there is no penalty for filing a Federal return late.  If you have Federal taxes due, then there can be two types of penalties--failure-to-file penalty and failure-to-pay penalty (and interest).    If you have a State return, then you'd need to check with your State about that to see what their penalties and interest are.

It is too late to prepare and file a return using the Online TT 2012.  TT Online is shut down until the Online 2013 comes online in a few weeks.  And you cannot efile a 2012 return.  It will have to be printed and mailed.

You can purchase a CD or download version of TT 2012 either from the TT website, or through a reputable retailer such as Amazon, which currently is showing a discount both for CD's and download.

To purchase from TT:
https://turbotax.intuit.com/personal-taxes/past-years-products.jsp

One State program download is included with the products on that TT page.  There is no need to purchase an additional State program there..    If you don't need a State return, then Amazon is currently selling the Deluxe product on CD without the State program at a special discount.

  • Is there a way to tie in the pre-loaded information from previous online submitted tax returns into the download version? i.e. if I have rental properties with depreciation info that is already loaded into the online system will that be accessible in the downloaded software?
  • If you saved the 2011 tax return as a .tax2011 file last year to your computer then you can transfer to the downloaded program.
  • what if I wait till next year?
  • EVY1
    What if you wail until next year to do what?  File a 2012 return?   If you are due a refund, there is no penalty for filing a Federal return late--you have up to 3 years to claim any refund..  If you have Federal taxes due, then there can be two types of penalties--failure-to-file penalty and failure-to-pay penalty (and interest).    If you have a State return, then you'd need to check with your State about that to see what their penalties and interest are.

    NOTE:  Since it's not clear what you meant, I'll add this.  You cannot combine the 2012 and 2013 into a single return next year.   Each year is a separate preparation and filing.
  • I need my 2012...can I do this now
  • andreaow1952:
    What are you wanting to do?   If you need to start a 2012 return, you'd need to purchase the 2012 desktop software (CD or download).  It can be purchased from TurboTax website or at a discount from reputable online retailers like Amazon.   A 2012 return cannot be prepared online with TurboTax, and it cannot be eilfed with TurboTax.   It has to be printed and mailed.  

    http://turbotax.intuit.com/personal-taxes/past-years-products.jsp
  • That is all fine, but what about all the data loaded into the 2012 file?  You can't tell me Turbo doesn't keep that info????
  • elliott,katherin:
    If it's an online return, it depends on whether the data was loaded into a paid return or an unpaid return.   Unpaid returns are purged from the TT system when online TT closes closes down at the end of extending filing season.

    Here's info on accessing prior-year returns:
    https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1900748-access-2012-or-earlier-returns-in-turbotax-online

    If you paid for your online return prior to the shutdown, then you should be able to get your tax data file at some point and finish it in the desktop product.  Many are caught in limbo as the TT website transitions from the end of 2012 and the startup of the 2013 product.    It's not certain what date the *.tax2012 data files will be available.  A PDF may be available now for some people.    The paid-for, but unifnished, return can be finished in the 2012 desktop product, which can be obtained by talking to TT Customer Support:

    https://turbotax.intuit.com/support/contact/index.jsp  

    When at that support page, in the search line enter some keywords or question without quotes. On the next page, skip the suggested topic links and scroll down until you see two interfaces ONLINE CHAT or CALL US.  It should show the wait times for each.

    Support hours this time of year are 8 AM - 5 PM Pacific, Mon-Fri.

    How the phone and chat support system works:
    http://turbotax.intuit.com/support/iq/Recommendations/Trying-to-Contact-Us-or-Reach-the-TurboTax-Support-Telephone-Number-/GEN12151.html
  • Elliott.katherin :
    If you started a return online and did not pay the TT fee then your return was considered abandoned and has been purged from the system. If you wish to use TT then you will need to start over in a downloaded program and mail the return in since the e-file has closed for 2012 returns.
  • I am active duty military and have been on deployment to a combat zone since mid-January. I got back a couple weeks ago but I still have to file my 2012 taxes. I realize I will likely still have to purchase the desktop software, but is there a fee if I end up owing Federal Taxes?
  • jwmiller1004:
    If you need to purchase 2012 software, Amazon has a current special CD prices of $6-$16 on the 2012 product, with Premier actually being the lower price.  And most of them include a State program.

    I'm not a tax expert, but a fellow user.  According to the following IRS article, if you have been serving in a combat zone or have "qualifying service outside a combat zone", then "In general, the deadlines for performing certain actions applicable to ... taxes are extended for the period of...service in the combat zone, plus 180 days after [the] last day in the combat zone."
    http://www.irs.gov/uac/Extension-of-Deadlines-%E2%80%94-Combat-Zone-Service

    This is also true for those who "serve in the Armed Forces on deployment outside the United States away from your permanent duty station while participating in a contingency operation."  (as defined in the publication below)

    Read more detail about the above, as well as other info for the military in:
    IRS Pub. 3 - Armed Forces Tax Guide
    http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p3.pdf

    I don't know if states grant the same deadline extensions on any state return, if applicable.  You could check with your state tax agency.
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