why does my tax refund goes down after filing another w2

I entered in my w2 for one job and got a pretty good amount. After filing my second job, my returns went down about 600 dollars. Why is that?
  • after i added my 1099-g that i had taxes taken from it ( i requested it) my refund got smaller then its not refunding me any of those taxesi paid. it didnt do this to me last year what is going on?!?!?!
  • Read my answer below. The same thing applies to entering a 1099-G to other income already entered as entering a W-2 then another W-2.
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When you enter your first W-2, the standard or itemized deductions and exemptions are subtracted from the income before the amount of tax due is calculated so only a portion or maybe none of the income is being taxed and it appears like you are getting most or all of tax withheld as a refund. When you enter the next W-2, most or all of it is being taxed since there are no more deductions and exemptions left to subtract. There is not enough tax withheld on that income to pay taxes on all of it so the refund goes down. The refund shown after entering the first one has no meaning and should be ignored. If all of your income and withholding from both jobs was reported on one W-2 the result would be the same but you would not see an interim refund amount that has no meaning.
  • i have a similar situation my wife recieved 3 w-2's from the same company (uhaul). However the 3 w-2s have different EIN's, employer Identification Numbers, different employer name but same address (they are all the same company). when i initially put in the amount off of her last paystub for ytd we were getting a tax refund of over $5,00.00. When i got her w-2s and add the amounts up in each block  its the exact same amount. Why am i losing money in my tax return for the same amount of money just being divided up into different w-2's under income?
  • What if I filed my w2's separate? Would that make any difference? Because it feels like I am getting ripped. I work 60 hours every week from the two jobs that i have with student loans calling me every week saying i have a payment coming up. Hoping to get a breather from my taxes but I get less on my refund because I have two jobs? How is this fair. Texas Roger your answer makes sense but why would TurboTax deceive you with the refund that is calculated so only a portion or maybe none of the income is being taxed? But after you put in another w2 it automatically deducted? I don't get it.
  • I'm right there with Yanwar. I work my butt off with two jobs all year long trying to make ends meet and getting paid like I'm only working one job. I expect to get at least something near my tax return last year and it gets cut into a THIRD of what I had coming. What the crap?! I don't understand how my working my butt off results in less money back.... Even if the government is taking out less money from our paychecks, why would Turbo-tax put in an amount at the top that won't be sticking around?
  • I have the same problm [Edited for Profanity]
  • I'm even more confused! I had 1 job with my previous return. Now I have that same job (made more $ than previous year) and a fairly new job and somehow my return is almost 1/4 of what it was last year...
  • TurboTax puts that refund calculator in because most people say they like to see it but, unfortunately, your refund can't be accurate until all of the data is in.  Tax rates keep going up, up, up and that's why your refunds keep going down.   

    As to the comment about filing your W-2s "separately" -- that is not an option.
  • call Obama and gripe at him !! wait a couple of years and you will really be pissed !!
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If I have two W-2s, can I only file one?
  • No. You must report all income from all sources no matter how small on your one tax return.
  • That doesn't make sense to me. I file for one job and get more than filing for two? I work extra hours and get less back? Why can't I just not file my second job if its under 15K? (I know that would be called lying on my taxes, and I didn't, I filed for both, but I just don't understand)
  • When you enter your first W-2, the standard or itemized deductions and exemptions are subtracted from the income before the amount of tax due is calculated so only a portion or maybe none of the income is being taxed and it appears like you are getting most or all of tax withheld as a refund. When you enter the next W-2, most or all of it is being taxed since there are no more deductions and exemptions left to subtract. There is not enough tax withheld on that income to pay taxes on all of it so the refund goes down. The refund shown after entering the first one has no meaning and should be ignored. If all of your income and withholding from both jobs was reported on one W-2 the result would be the same but you would not see an interim refund amount that has no meaning.
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Can I only file one W-2n if I have two from separate jobs ?
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    you can only report one w-2 as long as you dont  have to pay in taxes i think its around 15k if u make more than that though than be careful but you do what u gotta do.
    • You may be confusing whether or not you must file a tax return with whether or not you must report more than one W-2. If your total income is below a certain amount, you don't have to file a tax return. If it is above that amount and you must file a return, you must include all income from all sources on your tax return. Here is a link to an IRS pub that explains who must file a return: http://www.irs.gov/Individuals/Do-You-Need-to-File-a-Federal-Income-Tax-Return%3F-
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    they got everything screwed up this year somehow im getting more back this year and made the same as last year the tax code in each state is getting extremly complicated i beleive there is going to be some serious difficulties and mistakes with are taxes for years to come if your not sure with your taxes and they are complicated i suggest you have it looked at by 2 seperate sources.
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