Where to fill out expenses for W2-hourly all-inclusive rate?
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New Member

Where to fill out expenses for W2-hourly all-inclusive rate?

I am an hourly W2 consultant on an all-inclusive rate.  Obviously, I have been taxed all of 2016 on my expenses.  I have lodging, airfare, etc each week that needs to be entered.  

Where do I enter this in turbo tax?

1) Business>> Business income and Expenses OR
2) Other Deductions & Credits >> Employment expenses.  It seems I cannot enter travel expenses etc here.

Thank you!!
1 Reply
New Member

Where to fill out expenses for W2-hourly all-inclusive rate?

As a W-2 consultant on an all-inclusive rate, your travel expenses and other work-related expenses will be reported on Form 2106 and carried automatically to other Itemized Deductions (mortgage interest, property taxes, state income tax, donations, etc.) on Schedule A.

This is distinct from being an independent contractor consultant paid on a 1099-MISC and filing a Schedule C for Self-Employment.

Job-related expenses are reported on Form 2106 (Employee Business Expenses).

1.       Open (continue) your return in TurboTax.
(To do this, sign in to TurboTax and click the orange Take me to my return button.)

2.       In the search box, search for 2106 and then click the "Jump to" link in the search results.

3.       At the Tell us about the occupation you have expenses for screen, enter your occupation.

4.       Click Continue and follow the onscreen instructions.  

If you land on the Job-Related Expenses Summary screen instead, you can either Edit expenses for an existing job or click Add Another Occupation to enter expenses for a new one.

 Here are some other employment related costs that may be helpful investigating:

  • Home office costs. The office must be your principal place of business and be for the convenience of your employer—not just helpful in conducting your job.
  • Job search expenses in your current occupation, even if you don’t land a new job. This includes everything from the cost of producing and copying your resume to travel expenses you incur while interviewing or searching for a job.
  • Legal fees related to doing or keeping your job.
  • The cost of a passport for a business trip.
  • Union dues and expenses. However, you cannot deduct the portion of the fees that pays for sick, accident or death benefits or for a pension fund, even if the fees are required dues.
  • Work clothes and uniforms that are not suitable for everyday use and are a condition of your employment.
  • Tools (including the business use of your cell phone and internet)
  • Dues or subscriptions to professional societies
  • Licenses
  • Travel and meals for business, including DOT per diem
  • Excess educator expenses
  • Education that either maintains or improves job skills or is required to keep your salary or job.


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