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fasteddie577
Level 5

Rental Property Expenses

When replacing ceiling fans and a range hood in a rental property due to breakdown, do these items need to be capitalized/depreciated or can they be expensed? What about a complete repainting of the rental unit? Expensed or capitalized? Thanks

1 Best answer

Accepted Solutions
RobertG
Expert Alumni

Rental Property Expenses

Repairs can be expensed, improvements need to be capitalized. It's a judgement call.

 

Capital improvements that add to the value of your rental property, prolong its life, or adapt it to new uses must be depreciated over a period of time rather than deducted as a current-year expense. This would include things like:

  • Remodels and room additions (including decks and porches)
  • New or upgraded landscaping, irrigation, sprinkler system
  • Hardscape such as pavement, block or retaining wall, patio
  • Fencing
  • Swimming pool, spa
  • Storm windows, doors
  • New roof
  • Central vacuum or security system
  • Upgraded wiring, plumbing, duct work
  • Central heating, AC, humidifier
  • New furnace, water heater
  • Filtration, soft-water, or septic system
  • Built-in appliances
  • New flooring or wall-to-wall carpeting
  • Upgraded insulation
  • Satellite dish

In other words, if you spent $8,000 on a new roof last year, the IRS won't let you deduct the entire $8,000 from last year's rental income. Instead, the $8,000 must be depreciated, which means you deduct it over a period of time instead of all at once.

To enter your rental improvements, simply follow the directions to enter your rental income and expenses. At some point you'll come across the Rental Summary screen. Select Start next to Asset/Depreciation and follow the onscreen instructions. We'll figure out which depreciation method works best in your favor.

 

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2 Replies
RobertG
Expert Alumni

Rental Property Expenses

Repairs can be expensed, improvements need to be capitalized. It's a judgement call.

 

Capital improvements that add to the value of your rental property, prolong its life, or adapt it to new uses must be depreciated over a period of time rather than deducted as a current-year expense. This would include things like:

  • Remodels and room additions (including decks and porches)
  • New or upgraded landscaping, irrigation, sprinkler system
  • Hardscape such as pavement, block or retaining wall, patio
  • Fencing
  • Swimming pool, spa
  • Storm windows, doors
  • New roof
  • Central vacuum or security system
  • Upgraded wiring, plumbing, duct work
  • Central heating, AC, humidifier
  • New furnace, water heater
  • Filtration, soft-water, or septic system
  • Built-in appliances
  • New flooring or wall-to-wall carpeting
  • Upgraded insulation
  • Satellite dish

In other words, if you spent $8,000 on a new roof last year, the IRS won't let you deduct the entire $8,000 from last year's rental income. Instead, the $8,000 must be depreciated, which means you deduct it over a period of time instead of all at once.

To enter your rental improvements, simply follow the directions to enter your rental income and expenses. At some point you'll come across the Rental Summary screen. Select Start next to Asset/Depreciation and follow the onscreen instructions. We'll figure out which depreciation method works best in your favor.

 

Publication 527

**Say "Thanks" by clicking the thumb icon in a post
**Mark the post that answers your question by clicking on "Mark as Best Answer"

View solution in original post

fasteddie577
Level 5

Rental Property Expenses

Thanks again. Greatly appreciated. 

 

 

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