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jpexpc
New Member

My son turned 18 on Dec 8th 2017 he earned a little over $10,000 in 2017. Would it be better if he filed his own taxes instead of me claiming him as 1 of 4 dependents?

 
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7 Replies

My son turned 18 on Dec 8th 2017 he earned a little over $10,000 in 2017. Would it be better if he filed his own taxes instead of me claiming him as 1 of 4 dependents?

Not a question of better, but rather what the law requires/allows.
Carl
Level 15

My son turned 18 on Dec 8th 2017 he earned a little over $10,000 in 2017. Would it be better if he filed his own taxes instead of me claiming him as 1 of 4 dependents?

You really don't get to choose here, since your son was under the age of 19 on Dec 31 of the tax year. If you qualify to claim him as your dependent, then it doesn't matter if you claim him or not. When he files his tax return he as to select the option for "I can be claimed on someone else's return". Therefore, if you qualify to claim him as a dependent, you should do so.

Use the tool at https://www.irs.gov/help/ita/whom-may-i-claim-as-a-dependent to see if you qualify to claim him as a dependent.

My son turned 18 on Dec 8th 2017 he earned a little over $10,000 in 2017. Would it be better if he filed his own taxes instead of me claiming him as 1 of 4 dependents?

If your son lives with you for more than half of year and he does not provide more than half of his own support, you can claim him as a dependent even if he files his own tax return .
In this case, he cannot claim his personal exemption which is $ 4050. When he files his tax return, he needs to select the option "I can be claimed on someone else's return." 
Assuming he files as a single person and his income is only from W-2 form, further he is not a student, then his earning income for 2017 $10,000 minus deduction allowed $ 6,350 will be equal to $3,650 taxable income. According to the 2017 tax table, he will owe $368 taxes. Just check his W-2 form line for tax withholding; his refund is the difference from taxes he owes ($368) and the amount of line 2  in his W-2 form.

[Edited: 01/21/2018 [5:35]]


Carl
Level 15

My son turned 18 on Dec 8th 2017 he earned a little over $10,000 in 2017. Would it be better if he filed his own taxes instead of me claiming him as 1 of 4 dependents?

Just to help with clarification of the above answer (which is correct, by the way) if the dependent is under the age of 19 on Dec 31 of the tax year, his earnings do not matter. He could earn a million dollars and still qualify as your dependent. What does matter is "support". So if he earned a million dollars and did *not* provide more than half of his own support, you still qualify to claim him as your dependent.
jpexpc
New Member

My son turned 18 on Dec 8th 2017 he earned a little over $10,000 in 2017. Would it be better if he filed his own taxes instead of me claiming him as 1 of 4 dependents?

Okay.  So he can still file his w-2 even though I've already claimed him right?  As long as he says yes to someone else being able to claim him as a dependent?

My son turned 18 on Dec 8th 2017 he earned a little over $10,000 in 2017. Would it be better if he filed his own taxes instead of me claiming him as 1 of 4 dependents?

Yes.
Carl
Level 15

My son turned 18 on Dec 8th 2017 he earned a little over $10,000 in 2017. Would it be better if he filed his own taxes instead of me claiming him as 1 of 4 dependents?

Absolutely. Your son is still required to file a tax return. But he's also required to select the option for "I can be claimed on someone else's return" since you qualify to claim him, and you *do* claim him.
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