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sheilaconlee
New Member

I owe significant capital gains. I have large donation of items to Goodwill appraised at $45,000, can I deduct it from cap gain? How much will it save me? Thanks!

 
5 Replies
KittyM2
Expert Alumni

I owe significant capital gains. I have large donation of items to Goodwill appraised at $45,000, can I deduct it from cap gain? How much will it save me? Thanks!

No, you cannot deduct your donation from your capital gain. It will go on Form 1040, Schedule A. The amount you save will depend on your personal facts and circumstances, such as your filing status and the other income and deductions claimed on your return.

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VolvoGirl
Level 15

I owe significant capital gains. I have large donation of items to Goodwill appraised at $45,000, can I deduct it from cap gain? How much will it save me? Thanks!

If you are able to itemize you just get a percentage of your deductions back. Like if you are in the 25% tax bracket for a $100 deduction you will save $25. It isn't added on to your refund. Deductions reduce your income so you get taxed on a lower amount.

 

And that is just for the amount that puts you over the Standard Deduction.  Now that the Standard Deduction is higher many people will be switching to the Standard Deduction.  And there is a max 10,000 limit (5,000 MFS) of property tax and state taxes "SALT".  And you can only deduct Medical that’s over 10% of your AGI.

 

For 2019 the standard deduction amounts are:

Single 12,200 + 1,650 for 65 and over or blind

HOH 18,350 + 1,650 for 65 and over or blind

Joint 24,400+ 1,300 for each 65 and over or blind

Married filing Separate 12,200 + 1,300 for 65 and over or blind

sheilaconlee
New Member

I owe significant capital gains. I have large donation of items to Goodwill appraised at $45,000, can I deduct it from cap gain? How much will it save me? Thanks!

Thanks for your reply.  My capital gains basis is $464,000 so I am in a 23% tax bracket with the medicare tax included, I believe. I am not doing a 1031 exchange, just paying the taxes, which I believe will be around $90K unfortunately. 

Anonymous
Not applicable

I owe significant capital gains. I have large donation of items to Goodwill appraised at $45,000, can I deduct it from cap gain? How much will it save me? Thanks!

who did the appraising and did you get it in writing?  assuming it wasn't publicly traded securities that were contributed  here are irs rules  and the appraisal must be submitted with the return which will prevent e filing.

there is also a requirement for donee acknowledgement which must also be submitted with the return

 

Appraisal Requirements
The appraisal must be signed and dated by a qualified
appraiser (defined later) in accordance with generally
accepted appraisal standards. It also must meet the
relevant requirements of Regulations section
1.170A-17(a).
The appraisal must be signed and dated by a qualified
appraiser not earlier than 60 days before the date you
contribute the property. You must receive the appraisal
before the due date (including extensions) of the return on
which you first claim a deduction for the property. For a
deduction first claimed on an amended return, the
appraisal must be received before the date the amended
return was filed. See Regulations section 1.170A-17(a)(4),
(a)(8).
A separate qualified appraisal and a separate Form
8283 are required for each item of property except for an
item that is part of a group of similar items. Only one
appraisal is required for a group of similar items
contributed in the same tax year, if it includes all the
required information for each item. The appraiser may
group similar items with a collective value appraised at
$100 or less.

Part III, Declaration of Appraiser
If you had to get an appraisal, you must get it from a
qualified appraiser. A qualified appraiser is an individual
who meets all the following requirements as of the date
the individual completes and signs the appraisal.
1. The individual either:
a. Has earned a recognized appraiser designation
from a generally recognized professional appraiser
organization for demonstrated competency in valuing the
type of property being appraised, or
b. Has met certain minimum education requirements
and has two or more years of experience in valuing the
type of property being appraised. To meet the minimum
education requirements the individual must have
successfully completed professional or college-level
coursework in valuing the type of property obtained from:
i. a professional or college-level educational
organization,
ii. a generally recognized professional trade or
appraiser organization that regularly offers educational
programs, or
iii. an employer as part of an employee apprenticeship
or education program similar to professional or
college-level courses.
2. The individual regularly prepares appraisals for
which he or she is paid.
3. The appraiser makes a declaration in the appraisal
that, because of his or her experience and education, he
or she is qualified to make appraisals of the type of
property being valued.

In addition, the appraiser must complete Part III of Form
8283. See section 170(f)(11)(E) and Regulations section
1.170A-16(d)(4) for details.
If you use appraisals by more than one appraiser, or if
two or more appraisers contribute to a single appraisal, all
the appraisers must sign the appraisal and Part III of Form
8283.
Persons who cannot be qualified appraisers are listed
in Part III of Section B- the Declaration of Appraiser.
Generally, a party to the transaction in which you acquired
the property being appraised will not qualify to sign the
declaration. But a person who sold, exchanged, or gave
the property to you may sign the declaration if the property
was donated within 2 months of the date you acquired it
and the property's appraised value did not exceed its
acquisition price.
An appraiser may not be considered qualified if you
had knowledge of facts that would cause a reasonable
person to expect the appraiser to falsely overstate the
value of the property. An example of this is an agreement
between you and the appraiser about the property value
when you know that the appraised amount exceeds the
actual FMV.
Appraisal fees cannot be based on a percentage of the
appraised value. See Regulations section 1.170A-17(a)(9).
Identifying number. The appraiser's taxpayer
identification number (social security number or employer
identification number) must be entered in Part II

 

sheilaconlee
New Member

I owe significant capital gains. I have large donation of items to Goodwill appraised at $45,000, can I deduct it from cap gain? How much will it save me? Thanks!

Thank you, however I already understand these rules as I am an USPAP Certified Personal Property Appraiser myself since 1982 (not doing my own appraisal of course) , but I appreciate your information. 

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