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pennylane1264
New Member

I made twice as much this year (still under $30,000) and my filing status is married filing separate but I'm getting 1/4 of what I got last year. Why?

 
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bluedeb
Level 15

I made twice as much this year (still under $30,000) and my filing status is married filing separate but I'm getting 1/4 of what I got last year. Why?

Making twice as you did this year than last year puts you in a higher tax bracket.  Also, there are disadvantages to file as Married Filing Separate.

 

Couples who file separately receive few tax credits. Separate tax returns may give you a higher tax with a higher tax rate. The standard deduction for separate filers is far lower than that offered to joint filers. 

  • In 2019, married filing separately taxpayers only receive a standard deduction of $12,200 compared to the $24,400 offered to those who filed jointly.
  • If you file a separate return from your spouse, you are automatically disqualified from several of the tax deductions and credits mentioned earlier.
  • In addition, separate filers are usually limited to a smaller IRA contribution deduction.
  • They also cannot take the deduction for student loan interest.
  • The capital loss deduction limit is $1,500 each when filing separately, instead of $3,000 on a joint return.

Generally, filing jointly will give you a bigger refund or less taxes due. When you file separately, your tax rate is higher and you won't be able to claim:

View solution in original post

1 Reply
bluedeb
Level 15

I made twice as much this year (still under $30,000) and my filing status is married filing separate but I'm getting 1/4 of what I got last year. Why?

Making twice as you did this year than last year puts you in a higher tax bracket.  Also, there are disadvantages to file as Married Filing Separate.

 

Couples who file separately receive few tax credits. Separate tax returns may give you a higher tax with a higher tax rate. The standard deduction for separate filers is far lower than that offered to joint filers. 

  • In 2019, married filing separately taxpayers only receive a standard deduction of $12,200 compared to the $24,400 offered to those who filed jointly.
  • If you file a separate return from your spouse, you are automatically disqualified from several of the tax deductions and credits mentioned earlier.
  • In addition, separate filers are usually limited to a smaller IRA contribution deduction.
  • They also cannot take the deduction for student loan interest.
  • The capital loss deduction limit is $1,500 each when filing separately, instead of $3,000 on a joint return.

Generally, filing jointly will give you a bigger refund or less taxes due. When you file separately, your tax rate is higher and you won't be able to claim:

View solution in original post

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