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I earned income in Ohio and then moved to NY in November when I got married. Question about residency and whether to file jointly.

I earned income in Ohio and then moved to NY in November when I got married.  I then started earning income in NY.  Should my husband and I file jointly?  How do I handle Ohio income?  Am I considered a NY resident for more than half a year?

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Hal_Al
Level 15

I earned income in Ohio and then moved to NY in November when I got married. Question about residency and whether to file jointly.

Yes, you and your spouse should file jointly. Ohio requires you to file a joit return if you filed a joint federal return. You indicate that you were a part year resident and your spouse was a non resident. Only YOUR Ohio income will be taxed.

Be advised that Ohio does a convoluted tax calculation for non-residents/part year residents. It calculates tax on total income, then it calculates a non resident/part year resident credit, which it subtracts from the tax it calculated on the total income. The credit is calculated as your non-Ohio income divided by Total adjusted Income multiplied by the total tax. TurboTax (TT)   does this by allocating your income as either Ohio or non-Ohio. W-2 income will be allocated by the state name abbreviation shown in box 15 of your W-2. TT will ask you, item by item, in the state section, how much of your other income is Ohio or non-Ohio income. Make sure that your non-Ohio wages show NY (Other state postal abbreviation)  in box 15 of your W-2 screen, with the NY amount in box 16.

This system allows Ohio to apply their highest tax rate, based on your total income, while only taxing your Ohio income.

Ohio has a nonresident credit allocation form, IT NRC

http://www.tax.ohio.gov/portals/0/forms/ohio_individual/individual/2015/PIT_ITNRC.pdf

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1 Reply
Hal_Al
Level 15

I earned income in Ohio and then moved to NY in November when I got married. Question about residency and whether to file jointly.

Yes, you and your spouse should file jointly. Ohio requires you to file a joit return if you filed a joint federal return. You indicate that you were a part year resident and your spouse was a non resident. Only YOUR Ohio income will be taxed.

Be advised that Ohio does a convoluted tax calculation for non-residents/part year residents. It calculates tax on total income, then it calculates a non resident/part year resident credit, which it subtracts from the tax it calculated on the total income. The credit is calculated as your non-Ohio income divided by Total adjusted Income multiplied by the total tax. TurboTax (TT)   does this by allocating your income as either Ohio or non-Ohio. W-2 income will be allocated by the state name abbreviation shown in box 15 of your W-2. TT will ask you, item by item, in the state section, how much of your other income is Ohio or non-Ohio income. Make sure that your non-Ohio wages show NY (Other state postal abbreviation)  in box 15 of your W-2 screen, with the NY amount in box 16.

This system allows Ohio to apply their highest tax rate, based on your total income, while only taxing your Ohio income.

Ohio has a nonresident credit allocation form, IT NRC

http://www.tax.ohio.gov/portals/0/forms/ohio_individual/individual/2015/PIT_ITNRC.pdf
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